måndag 24 april 2017


Attached is last Saturday's annotated playlist. If you don't want to receive this any more just email me at backcountry@kdhx.org and I'll remove your name. You can listen to an archived version of the show for two weeks after the original airing by going to www.kdhx.org.

Thanks for listening and I'll see ya on down the road...
Jeff Corbin

The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 08/19/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:01PM-03:02PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:01PM Set break — Special membership drive edition of The Back Country. A few requests to catch up on, a couple of songs by folks playing in town and the rest of the show features albums/songs released in 1987 to celebrate 30 years of KDHX on the air. Sollie Paul “TEX” WILLIAMS was born on August 23, 1917 in Ramsey, IL. He caught a break when he moved to Los Angeles as the war broke out and met a fiddle player named Spade Cooley, joining his Orchestra as lead singer “Jack” Williams and referred to in the act as “Tex”. He was so popular that Capitol gave him his own contract, which set off Cooley, never an even-tempered man. Cooley fired him but badly miscalculated his position and most of Cooley’s band left him and went with Williams to form his Western Caravan. His 1946 recording of the Travis-Stone song “Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette) was Capitol’s first million-selling record and his particular style of talking blues over a musical bed of hot swing resulted in a number of hits. He also appeared in several B Westerns and several “Soundies” with fellow musicians Deuce Spriggins and Smokey Rogers. He left Capitol in 1951 as Western swing, like all of country music was receding before the rising tide of rock ‘n’ roll and he never again achieved such great success. He recorded for the Decca label to no avail and he disbanded the Western Caravan in 1957. He returned to Capitol in the ‘60s for a live album featuring Glen Campbell on guitar, and his last hit was a 1971 recording, “The Night Miss Ann’s Hotel for Single Girls Burned Down”. In 1990 he was inducted into the Illinois Music Hall of Fame along with Billy Grammer, Patsy Montana and Lulu Belle and Scotty. Tex Williams died on October 11, 1985 at the age of 73.
03:04PM-03:07PM (3:02) George Jones “Let's Say Goodbye Like We Said Hello” from Why Baby Why: Unreleased Recordings from his Golden Era (2017) on RWA Request — Previously unreleased recordings from the archive of Bear Family founder Richard Weize. These were made in 1956/7 as George made the move from Starday to Mercury Records.
03:07PM-03:09PM (2:41) Tex Williams and His Western Caravan “Miss Molly” from That's What I Like about the West (2002) on ASV Request — A caller last week mentioned Tex's upcoming birthday. The Back Country would normally have several birthday spotlight artists but this week is different.
03:10PM Set break
03:14PM-03:17PM (3:11) Gloria Attoun “Going to Dale's” from GO (2017) on self Local, New — Gloria is part of the lineup as Songbird Cafe returns to the Focal Point on Wednesday, August 23rd at 7:30PM The rest of the bill incudes Michael Bauermeister, Lynn Reif and Mike Schrand.
03:17PM-03:20PM (3:34) Wild Ponies “Mamma Bird” from Galax (2017) on Gearbox Records New — These folks are at Oak Tree Concerts tonight, 8PM start. Lots of good players on this one including Fats Kaplin, Will Kimbrough and Kilby Spencer.
03:20PM Set break
03:23PM-03:25PM (2:19) The Louvin Brothers “You're Running Wild” from When I Stop Dreaming: The Best Of The Louvin Brothers (1995) on Razor & Tie Request — From the Capitol label in 1956, going out to Bill and Annabelle.
03:26PM-03:30PM (4:50) Dave Alvin “King of California” from King of California (1987) on Hightone — Dave's West of the West Train Tour pulls into St. Louis at Off Broadway tonight. Passengers on the manifest include Jon Langford, CindyLee Berrywell and Christy McWilson. This album was released 30 years ago.
03:30PM Set break
03:34PM-03:37PM (3:04) Emmylou Harris “Angel Band” from Angel Band (1987) on Warner Bros. — Emmylou's only gospel album came out in 1987. Like everything she does it's a cut above most in the genre.
03:37PM-03:41PM (4:09) Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris “Farther Along” from Trio (1987) on Warner — The first Trio album was joined by a second in 1994 and last year saw the release of the 3-disc Complete Trio Collection. This concludes the gospel portion of our show today.
03:41PM Set break
03:44PM-03:48PM (3:37) Norman Blake and Tony Rice “Last Train from Poor Valley” from Blake & Rice (1987) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — This great album also deserved a second one, and it came out in 1990 and included Doc Watson on some of the tracks.
03:48PM-03:51PM (3:45) Sam Bush “Leather Britches” from Late As Usual (1987) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — Sam wrapped up his run with New Grass Revival the year before this, his debut album came out.,
03:52PM Set break
03:54PM-03:56PM (2:49) Steve Goodman “(Now and Then There's) A Fool Such as I” from Unfinished Business (1987) on Red Pajamas — Posthumously released on Steve's label. Hank Snow had a big hit with this one in 1952. Written by Bill Trader.
03:57PM Set break
04:04PM-04:07PM (3:27) Merle Haggard “Twinkle, Twinkle Lucky Star” from Chill Factor (1987) on Epic — Recorded near the end of Hag's run with the Epic label.
04:08PM-04:11PM (3:39) Conway Twitty “I Want to Know You Before We Make Love” from Borderline (1987) on MCA — Recorded just a few years before Conway's untimely death.
04:11PM Set break
04:14PM-04:18PM (4:29) The Tom Russell Band “U.S. Steel” from Road to Bayamon (1987) on Philo (http://www.rounder.com) — One of the best honky tonk bands of the era. Tom returns to St. Louis on Friday, September 15th at Off Broadway for a seated show.
04:18PM-04:23PM (5:10) Ian Tyson “Claude Dallas” from Cowboyography (1987) on Vanguard Records — The great Canadian cowboy songwriter co-wrote this one with Tom Russell, who has also recorded it.
04:23PM Set break
04:27PM-04:30PM (3:05) Dwight Yoakum “Little Sister” from Hillbilly Deluxe (1987) on Reprise — This was Dwight's second album, following his great debut album, "Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc, Etc." Elvis had a hit with this Doc Pomus/Mort Shuman composition in 1961.
04:27PM-04:30PM (3:19) Rosanne Cash “Tennessee Flat Top Box” from King's Record Shop (1987) on Columbia — In a touch of irony, Rosanne recorded this Johnny Cash song for Columbia Records the same year they let Johnny go after almost 30 years. Props to the Cash family for their statement on the Charlottesville situation.
04:33PM-04:35PM (2:10) Nanci Griffith “Ford Econoline” from Lone Star State of Mind (1987) on MCA — Tony Brown produced this album and this is one of Nanci's original compositions.
04:35PM Set break
04:39PM-04:42PM (3:09) Lyle Lovett “If I Had a Boat” from Pontiac (1987) on Curb (MCA) — "Kiss my ass I bought a boat and I'm going out to sea".
04:42PM-04:45PM (3:21) Flying Burrito Brothers “Sleepless Nights” from Sleepless Nights (1976) on A & M Request — Going out to Ron in Chaseburg, WI. Gotta break the 1987 rule when someone becomes a member for the first time and is from out-of-state. Thanks for your support, Ron.
04:45PM Set break
04:49PM-04:52PM (3:05) k.d. Lang “Got the Bull by the Horns” from Angel with a Lariat (1987) on Sire/Warner — This song also appeared in Robert Altman's film, "Pret a Porter" (Ready to Wear) in 1994. The year after this release she recorded the wonderful "Shadowland": The Owen Bradley Sessions."
04:51PM Set break
04:53PM-04:56PM (3:06) Gene Watson “Everybody Needs a Hero” from Then and Now (1987) on Epic — This one made it to #28 on the charts, co-written by Troy Seals and Max D. Barnes.
The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 07/29/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:00PM-03:01PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:01PM Set break — Jerome John “JERRY” GARCIA was born on August 1, 1942 in San Francisco, CA and would have been 75 years old on Tuesday. His father was a Spanish immigrant who became a popular bandleader in the San Francisco area. Jerry dropped out of school at 17 and lasted nine months in the army before irreconcilable differences resulted in Jerry’s being booted out (I’m still trying to wrap my head around the fact that Jerry lasted nine months in the army). He began playing guitar in folk and blues joints in town and in 1965 he formed a band, The Warlocks, soon changed to The Grateful Dead to avoid confusion with another band of the same name. Although known for their extended jams, psychedelic concert scene and Deadhead followers, Jerry enjoyed perhaps his best times when playing steel guitar with the New Riders of the Purple Sage or doodling with David Grisman and Tony Rice, and the Dead’s “American Beauty” and “Workingman’s Dead” are classics of early Americana. Jerry had long had health problems, including heroin addiction and diabetes that helped put him in a coma in the mid-‘80s, and despite efforts to improve his health, the long, strange trip ended when Jerry died of a heart attack on August 9, 1995 at the age of 53.
03:04PM-03:08PM (4:22) Jerry Garcia and David Grisman “Shady Grove” from Shady Grove (1996) on Acoustic Disc (http://www.acousticdisc.com) — We owe a debt of gratitude to Dawg and his Acoustic Disc label for preserving so many great recordings, not just of Jerry but many great roots artists.
03:08PM-03:11PM (3:35) Chris Smither “Friend of the Devil” from Don't It Drag On (2002) on Tomato — Originally released on the Poppy label forty-five years ago in 1972. Chris returns to the Focal Point this evening, 8PM show.
03:11PM Set break
03:12PM-03:17PM (4:43) Old Salt Union “Bought and Sold” from Old Salt Union (2017) on Compass Records Local, New — The debut release on Compass Records for another local outfit making a name for themselves.
03:17PM-03:20PM (3:44) Gloria Attoun “I've Never Been to Prison” from GO (2017) on self Local, New — From Gloria's new album, one inspired by Paycheck, Haggard and Earle.
03:20PM Set break — Sorry to learn of D.L. Menard's passing. Doris Leon D.L. MENARD was born on April 14, 1932 in Erath, LA. He was known as the “Cajun Hank Williams, and, although he only met Hank once—in 1951 at the Teche Club in New Iberia--he remained an influence on his music. The following year he joined Elias Badeaux’s Louisiana Aces and soon took over the group’s leadership. His best-known composition, “The Back Door” (La Porte en Arriere), was influenced by Hank’s “Honky Tonk Blues”. It was recorded in 1962, sold more than half a million copies and has been recorded numerous times. However, D.L. understood no one had ever gotten rich playing Cajun music, so he maintained day jobs like running a gas station and, mainly, building rocking chairs at a factory he and his wife operated. He sang in a “tinny” voice and, according to Cajun musicologist, Ann Savoy, his strumming guitar style was influence by David Bromberg. Savoy divides Cajun guitar styles into two camps: Old Time Style like Cleoma Falcon and D.L. Menard Style. His 1993 album, “Le Trio Cadien” was nominated for a Grammy as was his 2010 album “Happy Go Lucky”, and the following year he received a National Heritage Fellowship award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He was part of a distinguished group inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2009 along with Jo-El Sonnier, Doug Kershaw and Jimmy C. Newman, and he was a fixture for many years on the Louisiana festival scene. D.L. Menard died on July 27, 2017 at the age of 85. Calvin Scott “SCOTTY” STONEMAN was born on August 4, 1932 in Galax, VA. He was part of the Stoneman Family, formed in 1956 by patriarch Ernest “Pop” Stoneman, himself an early recording artist who was part of the Bristol Sessions. Scotty was one of the most dynamic fiddlers of his day, filling his performances with a passion and intensity that few could match. His extended solos were a force of nature and a sight to behold. Unfortunately, Scotty lived his life at that same full, unbridled speed which marked his music, and he died March 4, 1973 at the age of 40.
03:24PM-03:27PM (3:01) D.L. Menard “Listen to Me When I Talk to You” from The Rough Guide to Cajun Dance (2004) on World Music — Recorded in 1995 for Swallow Records. RIP, Mr. Menard.
03:27PM-03:30PM (3:29) T'Monde “Making Believe” from Making Believe (2012) on SWALLOW RECORDS (http://www.swallowrecords.com) — This Cajun trio is at The Focal Point next Wednesday, August 2nd. They do a good job of blending the Cajun and country sounds.
03:30PM-03:34PM (4:09) Scotty Stoneman and the Kentucky Colonels “Sally Goodin” from Live in LA with the Kentucky Colonels (2002) on Rural Rhythm — Recorded in 1965. Every time I hear this recording, by the end of the song I'M exhausted.
03:35PM Set break — Elliott Charles Adnopoz, aka RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT, was born on August 1, 1931 in Brooklyn, NY and will be 86 years old on Tuesday. Saturday afternoon movies and, later, television fueled a deep love affair with the Old West and young Elliott took to calling himself “Buck Elliott”, even running away from home at 16 to join a rodeo before returning to finish high school. After stints at two colleges, he dropped out and took the name Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, settling in folk-music Mecca, Greenwich Village. He became friends with Woody Guthrie and eventually moved in with Woody and his family on Coney Island. He traveled extensively in Europe during the 1950s, recorded for Topic records in England, and toured with Pete Seeger and the Weavers as well. His first album in the U.S. was 1961’s “Jack Elliott Sings the Songs of Woody Guthrie”. After a successful appearance at the legendary Newport Folk Festival in 1963 he signed with Vanguard and his first album for them included a young admirer named Bob Dylan playing harmonica, although Bob used the name “Tedham Porterhouse” for the session. He later joined Dylan as part of the Rolling Thunder Review in the 1970s. He recorded only sporadically in the ‘70s and ‘80s, but returned in the 1990s with a Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album for “South Coast”. He won another in 2009 for his latest release, “A Stranger Here” for Best Traditional Blues. Jack Elliott is one of the last living links to the Dust Bowl/Depression-Era songwriters of that time.
03:36PM-03:38PM (2:12) Ramblin' Jack Elliott “Crash on the Highway” from The Lost Topic Tapes: Isle of Wight 1957 (2004) on HighTone Records — Recorded 60 years ago in 1957 for the Topic label. This is Jack's version of the Reverend Dorsey Dixon's, "Wreck on the Highway", made famous by Roy Acuff.
03:39PM-03:42PM (3:27) Ramblin' Jack Elliott “Take Me Back and Try Me One More Time” from The Long Ride (1999) on HighTone Records — Jack has recorded a number of Ernest Tubb's songs in his career, including this one.
03:42PM Set break
03:43PM-03:46PM (3:04) Leona Williams “New Patches” from New Patches (2008) on Heart of Texas Records — Going out to Bill and Annabelle in Farmington, one written by Tommy Collins.
03:47PM-03:50PM (3:35) Dale Watson and His Lone Stars “The Bottle Let Me Down” from Live at the Big T Roadhouse* (2016) on Red House Records (http://www.redhouserecords.com) — Dale's Ameripolitan Caravan with Celine Lee and Jake Penrod comes to Off Broadway on Thursday, September 21st, 7:30PM start.
03:50PM-03:53PM (3:30) Merle Haggard “Mexican Bands” from I Am What I Am (2010) on Hag Records Request — One going out to my air room sidekick, Roy, who will be doing handstands any day now, and maybe listening to old Mexican bands.
03:53PM Set break
03:55PM-03:58PM (3:12) Tom Irwin “Love Forever (Wherever You Go)” from All That Love (2017) on Clyded Records Local, New — Tom is a singer-songwriter from Springfield, IL. Who says you can't match flute and pedal steel guitar.
03:58PM Set break
04:04PM-04:08PM (4:17) Chris Stapleton “Last Thing I Needed, First Thing This Morning” from From A Room: Volume 1 (2017) on Mercury New — Fine cover of a Gary P. Nunn/Donna Sioux Farar song. Chris headlines the show next Saturday, August 5th, at the Hollywood Casino Amphitheater with Margo Price and Brent Cobb.
04:09PM-04:12PM (3:15) Margo Price and the Price Tags “Desperate and Depressed” from Live at the Hamilton (2017) on Third Man Records — One of Margo's compositions. She has a new EP coming out soon.
04:12PM Set break — A few tunes written by the great Hank Cochran. Garland Perry “HANK” COCHRAN was born August 2, 1935 in Isola, MS. In the early ‘50s Hank met Eddie Cochran and they became the Cochran Brothers, appearing on the California Hayride and Town Hall Meeting shows. Then they saw Elvis at a show in Dallas and, as they say, that changed everything. They appeared on the Big D Jamboree, became part of Lefty Frizzell’s backup band on a tour of Hawaii and then they split up. After a short stint in the Army, Hank got a job as a staff writer for Pamper Music’s California branch. He moved to the Nashville office in 1959 and gravitated to Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, where he quickly became friends with Harlan Howard and Willie Nelson. When Hank got a recording contract offer from Pamper, he got Willie signed to a contract with them before he signed one himself. Skeets MacDonald’s recording of “Where You Go I’ll Follow” was the first of Hank’s songs to be performed by others, but it was just the beginning. The songwriting business was slow initially, as Roy Drusky and Brenda Lee both turned down one of Hank’s compositions, but Patsy Cline recorded “I Fall to Pieces” and was subsequently often given the first opportunity to record his songs. Among his many hits are “Through That Door”, “A Way To Survive”, “She’s Got You”, “Why Can’t He Be You”, and “It’s Not Love (But It’s Not Bad)”. Hank Cochran was elected to the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1974 and he enjoyed deep sea fishing in his retirement. Jamey Johnson produced a multi-artist tribute album to Hank that came out in 2013. Hank Cochran died on July 15, 2010 at the age of 74.
04:12PM-04:15PM (3:09) Ray Price and the Cherokee Cowboys “A Way to Survive” from Ray Price and The Cherokee Cowboys, Vol. 9 (1995) on Bear Family — Originally recorded in 1966 for Columbia Records. Lots of great talent on this one, including Ray Edenton, Grady Martin, Buddy Emmons, Harold Bradley, Tommy Jackson and Buddy Spicher.
04:15PM-04:18PM (3:12) Patsy Cline “She's Got You” from The Patsy Cline Collection Disc 3 (1991) on MCA — Recorded in 1961 for the Decca label. One of a number of Hank's songs which Patsy recorded, taking this one to #1.
04:19PM-04:21PM (2:35) Emmylou Harris and The Hot Band “It's Not Love (But It's Not Bad)” from Last Date (2000) on Eminent Records — Released in 1982 on the Warner label. Glenn Martin co-wrote this one with Hank, Barry Tashian on the harmony vocal.
04:21PM Set break
04:23PM-04:26PM (2:54) Diesel Island “Far Away” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid Records Local, New — Carl Pandolfi plays keyboards on the album and here takes the lead vocal on his composition.
04:26PM-04:28PM (2:23) Dennis Stroughmatt “Wine Me Up” from Wrong Side Of The World (2017) on MME Local, New — This one was a big hit for Faron Young in 1969.
04:28PM-04:31PM (2:35) Moot Davis “What's the Matter with Me” from Hierarchy Of Crows (2017) on Wilburn Records New — A nice shuffle tune Moot wrote with Nick Autry, although most of his new album is more rock-infused.
04:31PM Set break
04:32PM-04:35PM (2:30) Colter Wall “Thirteen Silver Dollars” from Colter Wall (2017) on Young Mary's Record Co. New — The voice belies the age of this artist, who released this debut album in May before his 22nd birthday. Dave Cobb produced it and Robby Turner plays pedal steel. What the hell, that worked for Sturgill's first country album.
04:35PM-04:37PM (2:39) Jenny Don't And The Spurs “Nobody's Cryin' over You” from Call of The Road (2017) on Doomtown (http://https://jennydontandthespurs.bandcamp.com/) New — I'm enjoying this album from an artist based out of Portland, OR.
04:37PM-04:41PM (3:29) Sara Petite “Road Less Traveled” from Road Less Traveled (2017) on Sara Petite New — If you travel down the Pacific Coast from Oregon you'll hit San Diego, home to this artist.
04:41PM Set break — Horace LEON CHAPPELEAR was born on August 1, 1909 in Gilmer, TX. By the time he was twenty he had dropped his first name and teamed with Joe and Bob Shelton to form the Lone Star Cowboys. They played at KGKB in Tyler, TX before moving to Shreveport and appearing on KWKH, home of the Louisiana Hayride. Leon’s recording debut was a 1932 solo effort on the Gennett label. He and the Sheltons backed Jimmie Davis on a Bluebird session the next year and Davis got the Lone Star Cowboys a deal with Decca Records which yielded early Western Swing versions of “Deep Elm Blues” and “Just Because” among others. Leon formed his own version of the Lone Star Cowboys in 1935 that was even more jazz-oriented, featuring Lonnie Hall on fiddle and a succession of clarinet players. He signed with Decca in mid-year and then, as so often happened in those early years of touring, a car wreck in September left him with severe head injuries. Some people close to him swore he was never the same after the accident and, indeed, his behavior did become more erratic in his later years. He essentially retired from the music business in 1937 and stayed away for more than a decade, working as a policeman and pipefitter. In the late ‘40s he rejoined Jimmie Davis as a Sunshine Boy. After Davis moved to Capitol he got Leon--then know as Leon Chappell--a record deal and he recorded a number of singles like “Slow Down Sweet Mama” and “I’m A Do-Right Daddy” that featured a bluesy juke joint cum Western swing sound. After the contract with Capitol ended he returned to Shreveport and worked as superintendent of the city’s animal shelter, but health problems continued to plague him and when his marriage broke up he went into a deep depression. Leon Chappelear committed suicide on October 23, 1962 at the age of 53.
04:43PM-04:45PM (2:48) Leon's Lone Star Cowboys “I'm a Do-Right Papa” from Western Swing Chronicles, Volume 2 (2002) on Origin Jazz Library — Recorded in 1935 for Decca Records, one Leon Chappelear co-wrote with Jimmie Davis, who was probably responsible for Leon's signing with Decca.
04:46PM-04:48PM (2:56) Leon Chappel “You Hear Me Talkin'” from Automatic Mama (1999) on Bear Family — Even shortening his name couldn't restart Leon's career, this from the Capitol label in 1950.
04:49PM-04:52PM (3:32) Wayne Hancock “That's What Daddy Wants” from That's What Daddy Wants (1997) on Ark 21 — There's a straight-line connection between Leon Chappelear's music and much of Wayne's. Wayne is at Bobby's Frozen Custard in Maryville on Sunday, August 13th, 7:30PM.
04:52PM-04:55PM (3:09) Wayne Hancock “Slingin' Rhythm” from Slingin' Rhythm (2016) on Bloodshot Records (http://www.bloodshotrecords.com) — Finishing up today's Back Country with the title track to Wayne's latest release. Look forward to seeing steel guitar great Rose Sinclair as well. 


Attached is last Saturday's annotated playlist. If you don't want to receive this any more just email me at backcountry@kdhx.org and I'll remove your name. You can listen to an archived version of the show for two weeks after the original airing by going to www.kdhx.org.

Thanks for listening and I'll see ya on down the road...
Jeff Corbin

The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 07/15/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:00PM-03:01PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:01PM Set break — Songs for the important women in my life kicks off today's Back Country. LINDA Marie RONSTADT was born on July 15, 1946 in Tucson, AZ and is 71 years old today. Her early musical heroes were Hank Williams and Elvis Presley and she came from a musical family. She moved to LA after a year at the University of Arizona and played with the Kimmel Brothers, Bobby Kimmel and Kenny Edwards, who, along with Linda, formed The Stone Poneys, whose biggest hit was the Mike Nesmith-penned “Different Drum”. For her self-titled album in 1972 she used a band with Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Randy Meissner and Bernie Leadon which became The Eagles. Linda’s debut on the country charts was a remake of Wanda Jackson’s “Silver Threads and Golden Needles”, recorded 15 years prior. She continued to record hits on both country charts (“(I Can’t Help It) if I’m Still In Love with You”, “Love Is a Rose”) and pop charts (“When Will I Be Loved”, “Blue Bayou”). And in 1987 she recorded “Trio” with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, which went platinum. Trio II was released a dozen years later to more acclaim. Linda has also recorded albums of Mexican folk songs in the mariachi and ranchero traditions, as well as appearing on Broadway. She most recently recorded an album of Cajun music with Ann Savoy, “Adieu, False Heart”. In 2013 Linda announced that she had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease, which has left her unable to sing any more.
03:04PM-03:07PM (3:13) Townes Van Zandt “Katie Belle” from Together at the Bluebird Cafe (2001) on american Records — Going out to my daughter, Sarah Caitlin, whose birthday is today.
03:07PM-03:12PM (4:47) Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstadt and Dolly Parton “Feels Like Home” from Trio II (1999) on Asylum — And one chosen by my wife, whose birthday will be Wednesday. Happy Birthday, Maggie! A Randy Newman song and the name of Roy Kasten's fine show Wednesday mornings on KDHX.
03:11PM Set break — A set of music featuring artists who became well-known through the efforts of Ralph Rinzler to get their music out before wider audiences. Musician and folk musicologist RALPH Carter RINZLER was born on July 20, 1934 in New York City, NY. Growing up in Passaic, NJ he was fascinated with the family’s wind-up record player and at age seven he was playing Library of Congress field recordings on it. He was inspired by Pete Seeger to take up the banjo while at Swarthmore College and he and Pete’s half-brother, Mike, traveled around Maryland and Virginia collecting folk songs. He joined the Greenbriar Boys in 1958, tempering their straightup bluegrass style with folk material. He accepted a position with the New York Public Library to catalog the 1500+ recordings of Harry Smith, which led to a position as Director of Field Research Programs with the Newport Folk Festival. The importance of his fieldwork cannot be overemphasized, as he played a large part in exposing a new and international generation to the music of Bill Monroe, Clarence Ashley, Doc Watson and the Balfa Brothers. He later held a similar position with the Smithsonian Institute, which created the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at the Center for Folklife and and Cultural Heritage, containing more than 17,000 commercially released discs, more than 2000 compact discs, 4,000 acetate discs, 45,000 audio tapes, 2,000 video tapes and more than half a million feet of motion picture film. Ralph Rinzler died on July 2, 1994 at the age of 59.
03:13PM-03:15PM (2:29) Clarence Ashley & Doc Watson “Tough Luck” from The Original Folkways Recordings of Doc Watson and Clarence Ashley, 1960-1962 (1994) on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings (http://www.folkways.si.edu) — Recorded in 1962 on Folkways.
03:15PM-03:18PM (3:08) Bill Monroe and His Blue Grass Boys “Kentucky Mandolin” from Country Music Hall of Fame (1992) on MCA — Recorded 50 years ago in 1967 on the Decca label. One of Bill's compositions.
03:18PM-03:21PM (2:46) The Balfa Brothers “Lacassine Special” from The Balfa Brothers Play Traditional Cajun Music, Vol. 1 & 2 (2005) on SWALLOW RECORDS (http://www.swallowrecords.com) — From their first album in 1965, here covering Iry LeJeune's classic tune.
03:21PM Set break
03:23PM-03:26PM (3:13) Woody Guthrie & Cisco Houston “Going Down the Road (I Ain't Going to be Treated This Way)” from The Best of the War Years (2002) on Stardust Records Request — Going out to Neil in St. Ann. Originally recorded in 1944 for Folkways. The "Hoot for Huntingdon's" All Star jam closes out Woodyfest 2017 tomorrow at noon in Okemah, OK.
03:26PM-03:28PM (2:45) Merle Haggard “The Roots of My Raising” from Merle Haggard The Capitol Collectors Series (1990) on CAPITOL Request — Going out to Bill and Annabelle in Farmington. Originally recorded in 1975, this is a Tommy Collins song.
03:29PM-03:33PM (3:46) Waylon Jennings “Slow Movin' Outlaws” from Wanted: The Outlaws, 20th Anniversary Edition (1996) on RCA — As the title implies, this classic album came out in 1976 and became country music's first million-selling album. This one didn't make the cut for the original release, but it's still a good 'un and one of Waylon's best songwriting efforts. Going out to D
03:33PM Set break — SARA Elizabeth Dougherty CARTER Bayes was born on July 21, 1898 in Flat Woods, VA. She was 15 years old when she met and married Alvin Pleasant Delaney “A.P.” Carter. The story goes that Sara met A.P. at the Copper Creek general store and A.P heard her singing “Engine 143” before rounding the corner to actually see her. The voice was enough for him. On July 24, 1927 an ad was placed in the Bristol Herald Courier that read, “The Victor Company will have a recording machine in Bristol for ten days beginning Monday to record records--inquire at our store”. She, A.P. and her sister-in-law, Maybelle Carter (eight months pregnant with Helen at the time), traveled the dangerous, winding mountain roads to Bristol to become part of the “Big Bang of Country Music”. She sang the lead vocal on almost all of the 273 recordings by The Carter Family. Few women in country music have balanced great musical talent and gender-defying stereotypes—including divorcing A.P. in an era where polite society thought it scandalous--while being immensely popular at the same time. Sara Dougherty Carter lived her life in a fashion true to herself and in a world which fictionalized women. Sara died on January 8, 1979 at the age of 80. Her funeral was held at the Carter Fold in Maces Springs, (now Hiltons) VA and she’s buried a few miles from there in the Mt. Vernon United Methodist Church cemetery next to her second husband, Coy Bayes, A.P.’s first cousin, and only a few feet from the grave of A.P. Carter.
03:34PM-03:37PM (3:20) The Carter Family “Engine 143” from My Clinch Mountain Home: Their Complete Victory Recordings, 1928-1929 (1993) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — Originally recorded in 1928 for the Victor label. One account of their meeting has Sara singing this song at the Copper Creek store when A.P. walked around the corner and first saw her.
03:37PM-03:41PM (3:42) Sadie Hawkins Day String Band “Lulu Walls” from Oh Me, Oh My! It's Sadie Hawkins Day! (2015) on self Local — These folks are at Laredo's in Lafayette Square on Friday, July 28th. This is a Carter Family tune.
03:41PM-03:44PM (3:43) Johnny Cash “Tears in the Holston River” from Will the Circle Be Unbroken, Volume 3 (2002) on CAPITOL — Johnny's tribute song to Maybelle and Sara Carter.
03:44PM Set break — Joseph Emmett “J.E.” MAINER was born on July 20, 1898 in Buncombe County, NC. He played the fiddle and his brother, Wade, played the banjo and in 1922 they formed the Crazy Mountaineers, later just the Mountaineers. They recorded into the 1940s and many recordings were released after J.E.’s death in 1971 on the Rural Rhythm label. Brother Wade lived another 40 years and died September 12, 2011 at the age of 104.
03:46PM-03:48PM (2:00) The Everly Brothers “Like Strangers” from Heartaches and Harmonies (1994) on Rhino — Another one of those great Cadence recordings, this one from 1960. Going out to Walter.
03:48PM-03:51PM (2:51) J.E. Mainer & The Mountaineers “Somebody's Waiting for You” from 20 Old-Time Favorites (1998) on Rural Rhythm Records — From a series of 1960s recordings.
03:51PM-03:54PM (2:29) The Chris Talley Trio “Goodbye and So Long to You” from Raining in My Heart (2009) on Chris Talley Trio (http://www.thebluegrassshack.com) Local — Two chances in the near future to catch these folks: Monday, July 17th at Bellerive Park, 7PM and next Saturday, July 22nd at Eckert's Concert Series in Belleville, 7PM. Alison Krauss features this song on her latest album as well.
03:54PM Set break
03:54PM-03:58PM (3:22) Trigger 5 “Off the Record” from AM Band (2015) on self Local — Trigger 5 is at BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups next Saturday, July 22nd, 4 PM show.
03:58PM Set break — Lloyd Estel “COWBOY” COPAS was born July 15, 1913 in Blue Creek, Ohio. Aside from local and regional radio stations and the occasional dance, his musical career didn’t really begin until about 1940, when he formed The Gold Star Rangers with Fiddlin’ Red Herron and Rusty Gabbard and moved to WLW in Cincinnati. His big break came when Pee Wee King replaced Eddy Arnold with Cope as lead vocalist for the Golden West Cowboys on WSM and the Grand Ole Opry. He became a regular on the Opry in 1946 and remained one until his death. His first hit was remake of a Spanish-American War-era song called “Filipino Baby”, which World War II helped repopularize. He went on to record a string of top hits for the King label, including “Signed, Sealed and Delivered”, “Tennessee Waltz”, “Strange Little Girl”, “Tragic Romance” and “Candy Kisses”. In 1960 he moved to the King affiliate, Starday Records and had a number one hit with “Alabam”. Cowboy Copas died on March 5, 1963 when the plane his son-in law, Randy Hughes, was piloting returned from a benefit show in Kansas City, ran into bad weather and crashed near Camden, TN. Also in the plane were Hawkshaw Hawkins and Patsy Cline. Richard Lee “RICKY” SKAGGS was born on July 18, 1954 in Cordell, KY and will be 63 years old on Tuesday. He was baptized in the Holy Trinity of Bluegrass: Six years old when he appeared onstage with Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys, the next year playing on the Martha White television show with Flatt & Scruggs and he and Keith Whitley joined Ralph Stanley’s Clinch Mountain Boys in 1970 at age 16. He also later worked in J.D. Crowe’s New South and with Emmylou Harris’ Hot Band, playing a key role in her album, “Roses in the Snow”. He focused on country music in the 1980s before eventually returning to bluegrass as he had promised Mr. Monroe he would do. Along with his band, Kentucky Thunder, he has won numerous awards from the Grammys, the Country Music Association and the IBMA. Ricky’s latest release was a 2014 release of duets with his wife and musical partner, Sharon White, “Hearts like Ours”. George Frayne IV, aka COMMANDER CODY, was born on July 19, 1944 in Ann Arbor, MI and will be 73 years old on Wednesday. He formed the Lost Planet Airmen in Ann Arbor in 1967 and after a few years of local and regional gigs they left for San Francisco. It was here that some original members left and were replaced with what became the best configuration of the band, including Billy Farlow, Bill Kirchen, “Buffalo” Bruce Barlow, Andy Stein and Lance Dickerson. They played country, rockabilly, R & B and Western swing in a straightforward style, focusing on the music. They had a top ten hit in Kirchen’s classic, “Hot Rod Lincoln” from their 1971 debut album, “Lost in the Ozone”, but their albums never matched their live performances in energy and exuberance. They reformed for a few years in the latter ‘70s before a twenty-some year hiatus that was broken with Cody’s “Dopers, Drunks and Everyday Losers” in 2009.
04:04PM-04:06PM (2:24) Cowboy Copas “Don't Let Them Change Your Mind” from Tennessee Waltz (2002) on ASV — Recorded 70 years ago in 1947 for the King label.
04:07PM-04:09PM (2:25) Ricky Skaggs “I Don't Care” from Country Hits - Bluegrass Style (2011) on Skaggs Family — The first of several Cindy Walker songs on today's show. Webb Pierce had a hit with this one in the '50s.
04:09PM-04:11PM (2:12) Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen “Lookin' at the World through a Windshield” from We've Got A Live One Here! (1996) on Warner Bros Records — Originally recorded at several locations in the UK in 1976. A Jerry Chesnut song.
04:12PM Set break — A set of songs written by the greatest female country music songwriter in history. CINDY WALKER was born on July 20, 1918 in Mart, TX. She was arguably (and you’ll get no argument from me) the finest female composer in the history of country music. She had an ability to write songs for an array of diverse stylists and had top ten hits in all five decades from the 1940s through the 1980s. She wrote more than 500 songs during her career, typing out the lyrics on a pink Remington manual typewriter. A virtual constellation of stars recorded her songs: Bob Wills, Eddy Arnold, Gene Autry, Bing Crosby, Willie Nelson, Ernest Tubb, Roy Orbison, Hank Snow, Ray Charles, Merle Haggard, Jim Reeves, Ricky Skaggs, Glen Campbell and Lacy J. Dalton. She was born into a musical family. Her grandfather, F.P. Eiland wrote hymns, while her mother, Oree, was a pianist. In 1940 she traveled to Los Angeles with her family, stopped at the Crosby Building in Hollywood and convinced Bing’s brother, Larry, to demo Cindy’s song, “Lone Star Trail” for his brother, who recorded it the following year and saw it rise to #23 on the pop charts. In 1941 Bob Wills recorded four of her songs and in the next three years she wrote all 39 songs used in Wills’ western movies for Columbia. That same year she filmed the first “Soundie” musical short, “Seven Beers with the Wrong Man”. Her first top ten country hit was “You’re From Texas” in 1944, a year that also saw “When My Blue Moon Turns to Gold Again” for the Decca label. When her contract with Decca ended in 1947 she decided to concentrate on songwriting. She moved back to Texas in 1954 to live with her mother in Mexia, travelling periodically to Nashville to shop her work. She arose each day at 5 o’clock to work on her craft. In 1970 Cindy was inducted as a charter member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 1997 she was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame and the following year former Texas Playboy Leon Rausch released an album of 20 Walker songs, including a new one, “Ruidoso”. Cindy Walker died on March 23, 2006 at the age of 87, but not before she got to hear the latest Willie Nelson album, “You Don’t Know Me: The Songs of Cindy Walker”. Johnny Gimble, another Texas Playboy, who played on the Nelson album, summed up Cindy’s songs thusly: “They had good melodies, good chords and good stories. They were true”.
04:13PM-04:15PM (2:32) k.d. Lang “Sugar Moon” from Shadowland (1988) on Warner — Cindy co-wrote this one with Bob Wills.
04:15PM-04:18PM (3:00) Willie Nelson “Not That I Care” from You Don't Know Me: The Songs of Cindy Walker (2006) on Lost Highway — Cindy got to hear Willie's tribute album to her shortly before she passed away.
04:18PM-04:21PM (3:11) Emmylou Harris “You Don't Know Me” from Cowgirl's Prayer (1993) on Elektra — Co-written by Eddy Arnold.
04:22PM Set break
04:23PM-04:28PM (4:24) The Mavericks “All You Ever Do is Bring Me Down” from Music for All Occasions (1995) on MCA Request — Dan from Kirkwood wanted to hear some old Mavericks. Happy to oblige.
04:28PM-04:31PM (3:03) Ivas John “Goin' Back to Arkansas” from Good Days a Comin' (2016) on Right Side Up Records Local — Ivas John and Gary Gordon are at the Focal Point next Saturday, July 22nd, for an 8PM show. They'll be live on The Back Country that afternoon.
04:31PM Set break
04:32PM-04:34PM (2:11) Johnny Horton “Let's Take the Long Way Home” from Rockin' Rollin' (1990) on Bear Family Request — Going out to Matt in Columbia, MO, from the Columbia label 60 years ago in 1957.
04:34PM-04:36PM (2:14) Ray Charles and George Jones “We Didn't See A Thing” from Friendship (1984) on Sony Request — Going out to Uncle Frank over at Pop's Blue Moon, from the Columbia label in 1983.
04:36PM-04:39PM (2:54) Dale Watson and Ray Benson “Write Your Own Songs” from Dale and Ray (2017) on Ameripolitan/Home Records — Asleep at the Wheel and Dale Watson are at the Rose Music Hall in Columbia, MO next Thursday, July 20th. My pal, Woody Adkins is bustin' at the seams for this one.
04:39PM-04:42PM (3:28) Lyle Lovett “Long Tall Texan” from The Road to Ensenada (1996) on Curb MCA — Written by bassman Henry Strzlecki. Lyle will be at the Peabody Opera House with his Large Band on Friday, July 28th, 8PM.
04:42PM Set break
04:44PM-04:48PM (3:35) Kacey Musgraves “Dime Store Cowgirl” from Pageant Material (2015) on Mercury Request — Going out to Linda on her birthday, from her brother Jim
04:48PM-04:50PM (2:58) Chris Stapleton “Second One to Know” from From A Room: Volume 1 (2017) on Mercury New — One of four co-writes with Mike Henderson which are on this album. Chris is at the Hollywood Casino Amphitheater on Saturday, August 5th, along with Margo Price and Brent Cobb.
04:51PM-04:54PM (3:57) Diesel Island “Pay My Bills” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid Records Local, New — Carl Pandolfi wrote this one. You can catch Diesel Island at several venues in town. They'll be at Joe's Cafe on Thursday, August 24th, 7PM. Going out to Mike Keller on his birthday. 

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jeff Corbin at KDHX via Spinitron <system@spinitron.com>
Date: Sun, Jul 2, 2017 at 5:50 AM
Subject: 7/1/17 Back Country Playlist
To: backcountry@kdhx.org



Attached is last Saturday's annotated playlist. If you don't want to receive this any more just email me at backcountry@kdhx.org and I'll remove your name. You can listen to an archived version of the show for two weeks after the original airing by going to www.kdhx.org.

Thanks for listening and I'll see ya on down the road...
Jeff Corbin

The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 07/01/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:00PM-03:01PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:01PM Set break — You could say it was Stephen Foster who kicked off the whole singer/songwriter genre in America. STEPHEN Collins FOSTER was born on July 4, 1826 in Lawrenceville, PA, since incorporated as part of the city of Pittsburgh. That day also saw the passing of both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. His was a middle-class family and Stephen probably received some formal musical instruction from Henry Kleber, a German immigrant who was influential in Pittsburgh’s burgeoning urban culture. Some of his earliest songs were composed for an all-male secret club of which he was a member, and his earliest work, “Open Thy Lattice Love”, appeared when he was 18. His first big hit was “Oh, Susanna”, published when in his early twenties. Numerous myths surround Foster’s life, including that he was a Southerner and wrote “Swanee River” and “My Old Kentucky Home” during or after visits to those locales. In fact, except for a month-long steamboat cruise to New Orleans for his honeymoon in 1852 and a couple of short visits to Kentucky towns on the Ohio River, he never set foot in the antebellum South. He worked hard at his songwriting, attempting to humanize his subjects beyond caricature and crudity. For example, “Nelly Was a Lady”, in 1849 laments the passing of a slave’s loved one, apparently the first song written by a white composer for the white minstrel show audience which portrays a black couple as a loving husband and wife, and giving her the appellation of “lady”, a term applying only to well-born white women of that era. This is not to say that Foster rose above the racist society in which he existed; compositions like “Old Black Joe” point to this. But Pittsburgh was a center for abolitionist activities of the day and one of Foster’s closest friends was a leader in the movement. Foster died on January 13, 1864 at the age of 37 with 38 cents in his pocket. He was primarily a composer not a performer, and there was no ASCAP or BMI at the time to see that he was paid fairly for the use of his work. Foster’s enduring compositions include “Camptown Races”, “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair”, “Old Folks At Home”, “Beautiful Dreamer” and “Hard Times”.
03:04PM-03:07PM (3:11) Emmylou Harris and The Nash Ramblers “Hard Times” from At the Ryman (1992) on Warner — This album shone a light on the quickly-deteriorating Ryman Auditorium when it came out and may well have saved the Mother Church of Country Music.
03:07PM-03:10PM (3:43) David Ball “Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)” from Beautiful Dreamer: The Songs of Stephen Foster (2004) on American Roots — Foster studied a map of the South until he came up with a variation on the Georgia-Florida Suwannee River that fit when composing this one.
03:10PM Set break — CHARLIE Pendleton MONROE was born on July 4, 1903 in Ohio County, KY. Note that Charlie’s middle name is taken from the “Uncle Pen” side of the family. He was the oldest of the Monroe brothers, and along with Bill and Birch, worked at the oil refineries in Indiana and began playing music together. Birch soon left the group and Bill and Charlie formed a duet and began traveling locally and throughout the South. They made a series of 60 recordings for the Bluebird label in the mid-1930s before going their separate ways. Charlie formed the Kentucky Pardners, who at one time or another included Lester Flatt, Curly Seckler, Red Rector and Ira Louvin. He signed with RCA in 1946 and moved to Decca in 1950, continuing to record and tour extensively until he retired in 1957. He played the occasional venues in the 1960s as the first wave of bluegrass festivals began and he continued doing this until he was diagnosed in 1974 with cancer. Charlie Monroe died on August 27, 1975 at the age of 72. Mitchell Jayne Dean, aka MITCH JAYNE was born on July 5, 1930 in Hammond, IN. He was hosting a radio show in Salem, MO called “Hickory Hollow” when he invited a local group, the Ozark Mountain Boys, to come on the show. The band included Doug and Rodney Dillard and Mitch soon joined them on bass along with Dean Webb on mandolin to form the Dillards, one of the earliest and most successful of the second-generation bluegrass bands. Mitch played a passable bass but he really shone as the group’s front man, where his homespun humor and down home ways created a vivid picture of life in the Missouri Ozarks. He later taught in a one-room schoolhouse in The Ozarks and helped preserve the culture of that area. Mitch didn’t play music in his later years due to hearing loss but he turned author, including his last book called “Fiddler’s Ghost”. The Dillards were inducted into the IBMA Hall of Honor in 2009 and Mitch died on August 2, 2010 at the age of 80.
03:12PM-03:14PM (2:43) Roy Acuff and the Smoky Mountain Boys “Lying Woman Blues” from King of Country Music (2004) on Proper Request — For Bill and Annabelle in Farmington--couldn't find the one you requested but Bashful Brother Oswald is on this one. From the Okeh label in 1941.
03:15PM-03:17PM (2:49) The Monroe Brothers “Where Is My Sailor Boy?” from Just a Song of Old Kentucky: The Monroe Brothers, Volume Two (2001) on BMG — Classic Monroe Brothers from the Bluebird label in 1936.
03:17PM-03:19PM (2:29) The Dillards “Hey Boys” from There Is a Time (1963-70) (1991) on Vanguard — Mitch Jayne was an unforgettable character. Herb Pedersen gets co-writing credit on this one, along with Mitch, Rodney and Dean. Originally released on Elektra in 1968 on "Wheatstraw Suite."
03:20PM-03:23PM (3:03) Dave Evans and River Bend “Highway 52” from The Best of the Vetco Years (2008) on Rebel Records (http://www.rebelrecords.com) — Sad to hear of Dave Evans' passing last Sunday. From their eponymously-titled debut album in 1979.
03:23PM Set break — In July 1832 European authorities granted cabinetmakers permission to continue making guitars, the outgrowth of a schism between the Violin Makers Guild and the Cabinet Makers Guild from several years earlier, with the former insisting that musical instruments could only be made by musicians themselves. As a result, many craftsmen left Europe for the U.S., including one who first settled in New York and moved five years later to Nazareth, PA. Christian Friedrich Martin founded the C.F. Martin Guitar Company in 1833 and it continues in operation today. PETER Hamilton ROWAN was born on July 4, 1942 in Wayland, MA, just outside Boston, and will be 75 years old on Tuesday. Peter comes from a family of musicians and counts among his earliest influences The Lilly Brothers, Dave van Ronk and Lightnin’ Hopkins. While still in high school he formed his first band, a Tex-Mex outfit, The Cupids. After three years at Colgate he hitchhiked to Washington, DC and caught the Country Gentlemen at the Shamrock Bar, which solidified his decision to become a full time musician. He played mandolin and sang as part of the Mother Bay State Entertainers, who released a 1964 album on Elektra. Late that year he reunited with Bill Keith, a former bandmate, and through that connection, he became one of Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys and began writing songs. He left Monroe in 1967 to form Earth Opera with David Grisman, and they released two albums. A short-lived stint with some former Blues Project rockers, Seatrain, and an album made with his brothers Chris and Lorin, bridged the time until Rowan, Grisman, Jerry Garcia, Vassar Clements and John Kahn formed Old and In The Way. Their 1973 album, recorded at The Boarding House in San Francisco, became the biggest selling bluegrass album of all time. The following year Rowan and Grisman joined Richard Greene, who had been a Bluegrass Boy at the same time as Rowan, and flatpickin’ genius Clarence White for a single album eponymously titled Muleskinner. Then came another stint of half a dozen years with his brothers as The Rowans, followed by mid-80s Tex-Mex/rock in the Free Mexican Air Force, featuring Flaco Jiminez. Over the next decade he explored the music of Woody Guthrie in Dust Bowl Children and Afro-Cuban, Latin and Carribean music with Awake Me In The New World. Bill Monroe had once told him “You can try to get away from bluegrass, Pete, but it will always call you back.” In 1996, the year that saw the passing of Monroe and another of his mandolin and vocal influences, John Duffey, it did, indeed call him back with the release of Bluegrass Boy, aided by stalwart musicians like Del McCoury, Charles Sawtelle, Laurie Lewis and Roy Huskey, Jr. He added his talents to Richard Greene’s Sales Tax Toddle the next year. His latest release came out in 2017, “My Aloha”, a look at the roots of Hawaiian music. Peter continues to “wear his own kind of hat” today. He is a follower of Tibetan Buddhism, a broad and deep musical explorer of many genres, and an American original--born on the Fourth of July.
03:26PM-03:29PM (3:58) Norman Blake & Tony Rice “D-18 Song (Thank You, Mr. Martin)” from Blake & Rice No. 2 (1990) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — This song was written by Jerry Faires but it's right in Norman's wheelhouse, isn't it?
03:29PM-03:32PM (3:50) Peter Rowan “Dust Bowl Children” from Dust Bowl Children (1990) on SUGAR HILL (http://ww.sugarhillrecords.com) — Happy Birthday, Peter Rowan.
03:33PM Set break
03:34PM-03:36PM (2:43) Jim Ed Brown “Am I Still Country?” from In Style Again (2015) on Plowboy Records (http://www.plowboyrecords.com) Request — Going out to regular listener, Jim.
03:37PM-03:40PM (3:37) Ray Charles “I Love You so Much it Hurts” from Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music (1998) on Rhino Request — And this one is going out to Jim in Glendale. From the ABC-Paramount label in 1962, a Floyd Tillman composition.
03:40PM-03:43PM (3:28) Lorraine Chavana “Born to Lose” from Free to Love (2015) on Rhinestone Records — Lorraine and I agree that Ray Charles had the best version of this Ted Daffan classic, but her's is mighty fine, to quote our pal, Gene Roberts.
03:44PM Set break — Lots of songs about cowboys, not so many about their horses. But what's a cowboy (or cowgirl) without a horse?
03:46PM-03:50PM (4:35) Jan Schiferl “Game Horse” from The Game Horse (2016) on Jan Schiferl — Jan and her husband have a cow/calf operation and horsemanship training facility in northeast Nebraska. This is an original composition of Jan's.
03:50PM-03:53PM (3:28) Marty Robbins “The Strawberry Roan” from Gunfighter Ballads and Trail Songs (1999) on Sony — From Marty's classic 1959 album on Columbia Records.
03:54PM-03:57PM (3:06) Gloria Attoun “I Don't Ride” from GO (2017) on self-released Local, New — This one is more of an un-horse song, or at least a riderless one. Gloria is part of Augusta Bottoms Consort and they'll be at the Focal Point next Saturday, 8PM.
03:57PM Set break
04:04PM-04:07PM (3:47) Rough Shop “Drink Up and Go Home” from Here Today (2008) on Perdition Records Local — Andy Ploof sings the hell out of this Freddie Hart classic. Rough Shop is part of a triple bill at Off Broadway tonight, along with The Red-Headed Strangers and the Sadie Hawkins Day String Band. 8PM
04:08PM-04:12PM (4:54) Eric Taylor “Deadwood” from Eric Taylor (1995) on Watermelon — Two chances to see singer-songwriter great, Eric Taylor in the near future, Saturday, July 15th at Log House Concerts, 8PM and Sunday the 16th at the Focal Point, a 7 o'clock show.
04:13PM Set break — Andrew Heissler, aka POKEY LAFARGE, was born on July 3, 1983 in Bloomington, IL and will be 34 years old on Monday. One of his grandfathers was a member of the St. Louis Banjo Club and he gave Pokey a guitar and tenor banjo. His twin interests in history and literature were buoyed by his discovery of blues music while still in his teens. He was busking in California and hitchhiking around the country when he met Ryan Koenig and Joey Glynn from a St. Louis band, the Rum Drum Ramblers, in Asheville, NC. Adam Hoskins joined the group and the South City Three became Pokey’s band in 2009 and their release that year, “Riverboat Soul” won Best Americana Album at the Independent Music awards. They repeated this in 2001 with “Middle of Everywhere” and toured with Jack White, who produced Pokey’s 2013 release on White’s Third Man label. He is featured on a track on Asleep at the Wheel’s third Bob Wills tribute album, “Still the King”, performing “What’s the Matter with the Mill?” Pokey signed with Rounder Records in 2014 and, with an expanded band that includes sax, trombone and clarinet, debuted “Something in the Water” in 2015. His most recent album came out in 2017, “Manic Revelations.” He has toured all over the world, yet despite his meteoric rise in music he calls St. Louis home and occasionally sits in on area musical gigs. He is one of St. Louis’ finest ambassadors.
04:15PM-04:18PM (3:17) Ivas John “Keep Your Train Movin'” from Good Days a Comin' (2016) on Right Side Up Records Local — Ivas and Gary Gordon are at the Focal Point on Saturday, July 22nd, and we'll have them live in our KDHX performance studio on The Back Country that afternoon.
04:17PM-04:19PM (2:40) Pokey LaFarge “The Devil Ain't Lazy” from Pokey LaFarge (2013) on Third Man Records (http://www.thirdmanrecords.com) Local — A standard found in most Western swing outfits. Pokey's latest album just came out, "Manic Revelations."
04:20PM Set break — William John Clifton “BILL” HALEY, Jr. was born on July 6, 1925 in Highland Park, MI. Blind in his left eye he left home at age 15, joining a popular group called the Down Homers, and later was a member of a group, the Four Aces of Western Swing, which featured Bill as a yodeling cowboy. He was music director at a radio station outside of Philadephia when he formed his group, The Saddlemen, and in 1952 he renamed them The Comets, a wordplay on the celestial body named for astronomer Edward Halley, whose last name was pronounced differently than Bill’s. It was Haley’s version of “Rock Around The Clock” in 1955 (and its inclusion in the Glenn Ford movie “Blackboard Jungle”) which helped launch the Rock ‘N’ Roll era, and he followed that up with a cover of Big Joe Turner’s, “Shake, Rattle and Roll”. The band later became a nostalgia act but continued performing through the 1970s, including a command performance for Queen Elizabeth. Bill Haley died in Harlingen, TX on February 9, 1981 at the age of 55, an alcoholic with increasingly erratic behavior due to an inoperable brain tumor. Twenty-five years after his death the International Astronomical Union named asteroid 79896Billhaley.
04:22PM-04:24PM (2:50) Bill Haley and The Saddlemen “Sundown Boogie” from Hillbilly Boogie (2002) on Proper Records — Sounds a lot like rock 'n' roll on this 1951 Holiday label recording. A year later they were renamed The Comets.
04:25PM-04:29PM (4:17) Chris Stapleton “Last Thing I Needed, First Thing This Morning” from From A Room: Volume 1 (2017) on Mercury New — Another fine album by Chris. This one was co-written by Gary P. Nunn and Donna Sioux Farar.
04:29PM Set break
04:30PM-04:33PM (3:10) Diesel Island “Poor Me” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid Records Local, New — Richard Tralles has the writing credit on this one. A pity party anthem.
04:33PM-04:37PM (3:09) Zephaniah Ohora With The 18 Wheelers “Songs My Mama Sang” from This Highway (2017) on Last Roundup New — Brooklyn has a decent country music scene and this guy is part of the reason why. This is a fine album.
04:36PM-04:39PM (3:26) Dennis Stroughmatt “Wrong Side of the World” from Wrong Side Of The World (2017) on MME Local, New — Dennis covers Johnny Bush on this one. He plays solo, with a country band, with Creole Stomp and with L'Esprit d' Creole.
04:40PM Set break — Were he still alive Keith Whitley would be 62 years old today and who knows what great country music he would have produced in that additional 28 years. Jackie KEITH WHITLEY was born on July 1, 1955 in Ashland KY and grew up in nearby Sandy Hook. His was a typical teenager’s life for the time and place, racing cars and first sampling the bootleg whiskey that would eventually kill him. He met Ricky Skaggs at a music contest when he was 14 and the next year Ralph Stanley heard them at a club and signed them as Clinch Mountain Boys. Ralph was waiting for a flat tire to be fixed when he walked in the club and heard what he thought was the Stanley Brothers on the juke box, but it turned out to be Ricky and Keith singing. When Roy Lee Centers died in 1974 Keith took over as lead singer in the group, and he also played during this period with J.D. Crowe & the New South. He signed with RCA and released a total of four albums, featuring a singing style you might expect from one influenced by Carter Stanley, Lefty Frizzell and Merle Haggard. He married Lorrie Morgan, daughter of Nashville and Opry star, George Morgan in 1986. Unfortunately, the last two RCA albums were released posthumously, the first of these, “I Wonder Do You Think of Me?” released three months after he died of acute alcohol poisoning on May 31, 1989 at the age of 33.
04:42PM-04:45PM (2:50) Ralph Stanley and The Clinch Mountain Boys “I'm Lonesome without You” from Classic Bluegrass (1990) on Rebel — From the Rebel label in 1976, two years after Keith took over as lead vocalist after the death of Roy Lee Centers. He was 20 when he recorded this but Ralph first found he and Ricky Skaggs when Keith was just 14.
04:45PM-04:48PM (3:10) Keith Whitley “(I've Always Been) Honky Tonk Crazy” from Sad Songs & Waltzes (2000) on New Rounder — From the RCA label in 1982, one co-written by Dean Dillon and Frank Dycus.
04:48PM-04:51PM (3:12) Keith Whitley “Would These Arms be in Your Way?” from Don't Close Your Eyes (1988) on BMG — From the last studio album released before his death the following May, featuring Vern Gosdin and Emmylou Harris on harmony vocals. Vern co-wrote this one, along with Hank Cochran and Red Lone.
04:51PM-04:54PM (3:19) Keith Whitley “I Never Go Around Mirrors” from Sad Songs & Waltzes (2000) on New Rounder — Co-written by Whitey Shafer and Lefty Frizzell, and there's a direct line of recordings from Lefty to Merle to Keith for this one


The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 06/17/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:01PM-03:02PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:03PM Set break — Sir James PAUL MCCARTNEY, MBE, was born on June 18, 1942 in Liverpool, England and will be 75 years old tomorrow. Released in 2013 was “Let Us In Americana: The Music of Paul McCartney…for Linda”, a compilation of 17 recordings of McCartney songs by various Americana artists, including Bruce Cockburn, Ollabelle, Rodney Crowell and Jim Lauderdale.
03:04PM-03:08PM (4:04) Alison Krauss and Tony Furtado “I Will” from Now That I've Found You: A Collection (1995) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — In honor of the 75th birthday tomorrow of Sir Paul McCartney, MBE. This originally appeared on Tony Furtado's 1992 album "Within Reach."
03:09PM-03:12PM (3:44) Tony Furtado “Some of Shelly's Blues” from Cider House Sessions: Live at Reverand Nat's (2017) on Yousayfurtado New — A Michael Nesmith song. Tony's new album includes Matt Flinner, Rob Burger, Luke Price and Stephanie Schneiderman.
03:12PM Set break — Valerie JUNE CARTER CASH was born on June 23, 1929 in Maces Springs, VA to Ezra and Maybelle Carter. With Maybelle and sisters Anita and Helen they began performing professionally after the demise of the original Carter Family in the early ‘40s, working with Maybelle’s brother and cousin, who billed themselves as the Virginia Boys. After the Boys left the music business Maybelle and the Carter Sisters performed for a short time on a Richmond station and then moved to WNOX, where they met Chet Atkins and Homer and Jethro. Chet was their lead guitarist at KWTO in Springfield, MO and Ezra Carter, the group’s manager, turned down a number of offers for them to come to the Grand Ole Opry but without Chet, as Nashville poobahs feared he may take some studio work away from established guitarists (they were right to be afraid, as it turned out). They finally relented and in 1950 they all moved to Nashville. She married Carl Smith in 1952, divorcing him in 1956, and country singer Carlene Carter is their daughter. A daughter from her second marriage died in a bus, likely from carbon monoxide poisoning. Her third marriage to Johnny Cash in 1968 lasted until her death on May 15, 2003 at the age of 73. She was also an actress, studying with Lee Strasburg in New York and appearing in films and on television. She was a gifted songwriter and singer, with a comedic bent that was a natural part of country music then, but is rarely seen today.
03:13PM-03:16PM (3:10) The Carter Sisters and Mother Maybelle “Fair and Tender Ladies” from Keep on the Sunny Side: June Carter Cash, Her Life in Music (2005) on Sony — Originally recorded in 1952 on the Columbia label. One of my favorite Mother Maybelle compositions.
03:17PM-03:19PM (2:48) Johnny and June Carter Cash “Jackson” from Keep on the Sunny Siude: June Carter Cash, Her Life in Music (2005) on Sony — Co-written by Billy Edd Wheeler and Jerry Lieber, this recording won a Grammy in 1968 after rising to #2 on the country chart the previous year.
03:18PM-03:22PM (4:07) Brad Paisley “Keep on the Sunny Side” from Anchored In Love: A Tribute to June Carter Cash (2007) on Dualtone (http://www.dualtone.com) Request — Going out to Bill and Annabelle in Farmington, although they asked for a different Brad Paisley song.
03:24PM Set break — Edward Windsor “EDDIE” ADCOCK was born on June 21, 1938 in Scottsville, VA and will be 79 years old on Wednesday. His first professional gig was on a radio station in Crewe, VA with Smokey Graves & His Blue Star Boys, which led to other opportunities to play with folks like Mac Wiseman, Bill Harrell and Buzz Busby. He also supported himself during this time as a semi-pro boxer and later had success as a stock car driver, winning many a race with his car, “Mr. Banjo”. He was a Blue Grass Boy for a short while but Monroe had to let him go because times were hard. He was working his day job in a sheet metal factory when he was invited to join Charlie Waller, John Duffey and Larry Lahey in The Country Gentlemen, replacing Bill Emerson on banjo. They rode the folk revival by incorporating country, folk and rock into their repertoire and remained popular throughout the 1960s. Tom Gray soon replaced Lahey on bass and Eddie stayed with the band until he quit in 1970 and moved to California. He met and married Martha Hearon there and they have performed together since then as a duo and occasionally appearing with the Country Gentlemen Reunion Band, with Jimmy Gaudreau having replaced the late John Duffey (Jimmy played in Eddie’s bluegrass group, II Generation in the late ‘70s). Eddie continues to be in demand today at festivals and other performance venues. Kathleen Alice “KATHY” MATTEA was born on June 21, 1959 in South Charleston, WV and will be 58 years old on Wednesday. She moved to Nashville in the late ‘70s, supporting herself with background singing on recordings and guiding tours of the Country Music Hall of Fame. She signed with Mercury records in 1983 and her third release for the label in 1986, “Walk the Way the Wind Blows” was a critical and commercial success, producing four Top Ten songs, including the title track and a cover of Nanci Griffith’s “Love at the Five and Dime” with Don Williams providing harmony vocals. Number one hits followed, including “Goin’, Gone”, “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses”, “Burnin’ Old Memories” and Susanna Clark’s “Come From the Heart”, and she won a Grammy in 1990 for Best Female Country Vocal with “Where’ve You Been”, co-written by her husband, Jon Vezner (and recorded by Dailey and Vincent on their new album, “Brothers of the Highway”). She is a social activist who has been involved in AIDS charities and global warming, as her recent album, “Coal”, a Grammy nominee, demonstrates, and she is a 2011 inductee into the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame. Her latest release, “Calling Me Home” focuses on the music of her native West Virginia.
03:25PM-03:28PM (3:11) The Country Gentlemen “Roving Gambler” from Country Songs, Old and New (1990) on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings (http://www.folkways.si.edu) — Originally released in 1960, this was the group's debut album.
03:29PM-03:33PM (4:14) Kathy Mattea “The L & N Don't Stop Here Anymore” from Coal (2008) on R.E.D. — Happy Birthday to Kathy Mattea, here covering one from the catalogue of the great Jean Ritchie. Marty Stuart produced this 2008 album, which went to the top of the bluegrass chart and won a Grammy nomination.
03:33PM-03:35PM (2:58) Tim O'Brien “High Flying Bird” from Where The River Meets The Road (2017) on Howdy Skies — Another song written by Billy Edd Wheeler. Chris Stapleton, Stuart Duncan, and Noam Pikelny play on this one.
03:36PM Set break — LESTER Raymond FLATT was born on June 19, 1914 in Duncan’s Chapel,TN. He left school at age 12 and worked in a textile mill in Sparta, TN, which became his hometown. He began in radio in 1939 and played with several bands, including Charlie Monroe’s Kentucky Partners. In 1945 brother Bill Monroe hired Lester as guitarist and lead singer in the Blue Grass Boys. In 1948 he left the Blue Grass Boys, along with Earl Scruggs, who had joined Monroe in ‘45, and formed the Foggy Mountain Boys. Early members included guitarist/vocalists Jim Eanes and Mac Wiseman, fiddler Jim Shumate, bassist Cedric Rainwater and Curley Seckler on mandolin. Some would argue that the Flatt & Scruggs sound was fully realized when Buck “Uncle Josh” Graves joined the group on dobro in 1955 Their popularity soared with the folk revival of the ‘60s and their recording of the Beverly Hillbillies TV show theme song, “The Ballad Of Jed Clampett”. Paul Henning, the show’s producer, saw Flatt & Scruggs at the famed Ashgrove club in L.A., wrote the song and had them record it. Flatt and Scruggs stayed together for 21 years, until 1969, when musical and business differences led to their breakup. Lester formed his Nashville Grass band, bringing Graves and Paul Warren on fiddle from the Foggy Mountain Boys and adding Vic Jordan on banjo and Roland White on mandolin, eventually replaced by Marty Stuart. The Nashville Grass recorded several fine bluegrass albums for RCA in the early ‘70s and Lester also recorded three albums during this time with former bandmate, Mac Wiseman. Lester’s health began to deteriorate by 1975 and he recorded and performed almost nothing after this time. He died on May 11, 1979 at the age of 64 and is buried in Sparta, TN. Flatt and Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys were inducted into the Country Music Hall Of Fame in 1985 and the IBMA Hall of Honor in 1991.
03:37PM-03:39PM (2:45) Flatt and Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys “I'm Gonna Sleep with One Eye Open” from 20 Greatest Hits (1988) on Highland — Originally recorded in 1955 on the Columbia label.
03:40PM-03:42PM (2:47) Lester Flatt and the Nashville Grass “Don't Get Above Your Raisin'” from RCA Country Legends (2003) on BMG — From the RCA label in 1972, Marty Stuart, age 14, on fiddle, along with Roland White, Howard Johnson, Paul Warren, Hazel McCormick, Charlie Nixon, Ray Edenton, Jerry Smith and Billy Linneman.
03:43PM Set break
03:44PM-03:47PM (3:22) Dennis Stroughmatt “Long Line of Empties” from Wrong Side Of The World (2017) on MME Local, New — A Darrell McCall song, Ron and Leona Williams are singing on this one too. You can catch Dennis this evening down at the Southern Illinois Opry in Herrin, 7PM showtime.
03:47PM-03:49PM (2:39) Dale Watson & His Lone Stars “Heaven's Gonna Have a Honky Tonk” from Call Me Insane (2015) on Red House Records (http://www.redhouserecords.com) — Two chances to catch Dale and the Boys in our area next week, Tuesday at the Rose Bowl tavern in Urbana, 7:30PM and Wednesday at American Legion Post 88 in Mattoon, IL,
03:50PM-03:53PM (3:19) Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys “The Good Ain't Gone” from Empty House (2004) on Bloodshot (http://www.bloodshotrecords.com) — These guys are at San Loo next Saturday, June 24th, along with Cree Rider Family Band and the one and only Fred Friction, 8PM start.
03:53PM-03:56PM (3:42) Whitey Morgan and the 78's “Good Timin' Man” from Sonic Ranch (2015) on Whitey Morgan Music (http://www.whiteymorgan.com) — And Whitey's back in town on Thursday, June 29th, at the Bootleg at Atomic Cowboy, 7PM.
03:57PM Set break — Clyde Julian “RED” FOLEY was born on June 17, 1910 in Blue Lick, near. Berea, KY. Red moved to the WLS Barn Dance in Chicago when he was twenty, playing with John Lair’s Cumberland Ridge Runners, and stayed until 1937. It was probably here that he learned to play slide guitar and gain an appreciation of the blues. He left Chicago and formed the Renfro Valley Barn Dance in Cincinnati, along with Whitey Ford (The Duke of Paducah) and John Lair. He returned to WLS from 1940-46 before leaving to host the Prince Albert Show on the Grand Ole Opry. Red’s second wife committed suicide in 1951, possibly as a result of learning of Red’s infidelity, and he abruptly quit his musical career. It was revived a few years later when Si Siman from KWTO in Springfield and John Mahaffey of RadiOzark Enterprises hired Red to host the “Ozark Jubilee”, first on radio, then on ABC where it was called Jubilee USA or sometimes Country Music Jubilee, from 1955 to 1960. With that ABC-TV connection, Red also became an actor. Who can forget Fess Parker in the title role of TV’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, featuring Red as Eugene Smith’s homespun philosopher, Uncle Cooter? Red’s hits are too numerous to mention here, but include the tearjerker “Old Shep”, “Tennessee Saturday Night”, “Peace In The Valley” and “Chattanooga Shoeshine Boy”. Red Foley was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1967 and died on September 19, 1968 at the age of 58.
04:04PM-04:06PM (2:40) Patsy Cline “Sweet Dreams (of You)” from The Patsy Cline Collection (1991) on MCA Request — I don't know who requested Patsy's definitive version of the Don Gibson classic but I thank them. From Patsy's last recording session in February 1963.
04:07PM-04:10PM (3:13) Red Foley “Midnight” from Country Music Hall of Fame Series: Red Foley (1991) on MCA — Co-written by Boudleaux Bryant and Chet Atkins, recorded in 1951 for Decca Records. I believe Chet is playing the guitar licks on this. Red was country music's answer to Bing Crosby.
04:10PM Set break
04:11PM-04:16PM (4:49) Dwight Yoakum “Fast as You” from Reprise Please Baby: The Warner Brothers Years (2002) on Rhino Request — This song was originally released on Dwight's 1993 album "This Time" on the Reprise label. The song peaked at #2 and the album at #4.
04:16PM-04:19PM (2:33) Diesel Island “When I Write My Number One” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid Records Local, New — Maybe this song, one written by Kip Loui, will be the first number one for this local favorite band. Pick up a copy of their new cd at their shows or at Euclid Records.
04:18PM Set break — Chester Burton “CHET” ATKINS was born on June 20, 1924 in Luttrell, TN. Chet’s parents divorced when he was young, but severe asthma forced Chet to go live with his father in Georgia when he was 12. It was while there that he first heard Merle Travis playing guitar as Chet tuned in WLW in Cincinnati. As Chet remarked later, it was hard to figure out from listening on the radio what the pickers were doing, so Chet developed his own variation of the “Travis Style” of playing. After high school and some basic lessons from his father, who was an itinerant music teacher, Chet got a job at WNOX in Knoxville, playing the fiddle for Bill Carlisle and Archie Campbell, and Chet was eventually featured on the midday music show there. He moved to Chicago in 1946 as Red Foley was leaving the WLS Barn Dance to host the Prince Albert Show on the Grand Ole Opry and he took Chet with him to Nashville, where Chet made his first record for the Bullett label. While working at KWTO in Springfield, MO he got his nickname Steve Sholes, the head of RCA’s country and western division heard Chet play. Chet returned to WNOX in 1948, playing with Homer and Jethro and Mother Maybelle and The Carter Sisters. He moved back to Nashville for good in 1950 and became the session guitarist for RCA’s “A” team of musicians, recording with Wade Ray, Webb Pierce and Hank Williams (that’s Chet playing on “Your Cheating Heart”). In 1955 Chet was named RCA’s A & R man in Nashville and eventually became responsible for all of their Nashville recordings, including those from the famed Studio B. But as Rock N Roll waxed so did country music wane and in an effort to increase sales with crossover, more pop sounding records, Chet, along with Owen Bradley, transformed the music in Nashville--substituting string arrangements and vocal choruses for steel guitars and fiddles. It worked for a number of country stars, including Eddy Arnold, Jim Reeves and Don Gibson. At almost the height of civil rights tensions in the US, Chet had the guts to sign Charley Pride to a recording contract with RCA. Chet made a number of albums with other fine RCA pickers including Hank Snow, Jerry Reed, Merle Travis and Les Paul. From 1967 through1988--22 years--Chet won CMA instrumentalist of the year in half of those years. In 1973 he became the youngest inductee in the Country Music Hall Of Fame at age 49 and twenty years later Chet was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from The National Academy of Recordings Arts and Sciences, putting Chet in select company like Louis Armstrong, Ray Charles, Leonard Bernstein and Paul McCartney. Chet died on June 30, 2001 at the age of 77.
04:21PM-04:23PM (2:36) Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed “Flying South” from Me And Chet / Me And Jerry (1998) on BMG — One written by the great Cindy Walker. These guitar greats made two albums in 1972 for RCA and they're now available on one disc.
04:23PM-04:30PM (6:33) Chet Atkins and Les Paul “Avalon” from Chester and Lester (2007) on BMG — Originally recorded in 1976 for RCA. This song is listed as a co-write for Al Jolson but composer Giacomo Puccini successfully sued for plagiarism, although the song's rights remained with Jolson et. al.
04:30PM Set break — Kristopher “KRIS” KRISTOFFERSON was born on June 22, 1936 in Brownsville, TX and will be 81 years old on Thursday. The multi-talented Kristofferson has worked on oil rigs, piloted helicopters, been a Rhodes scholar and Golden Gloves boxer, authored books, appeared in over a dozen feature films, and written some of the great songs in country music history. 1965 was a pivotal year in Kris’ life. He was a helicopter pilot stationed in Germany and when he came home for a furlough, he visited Nashville and met Johnny Cash. Later that year he moved to Nashville rather than accept a position teaching English at West Point, and as Bob Dylan recorded “Blonde on Blonde” at Columbia studios Kris was sweeping the floors there. His first break came when Roy Drusky recorded “Jody and the Kid” in 1968. Roger Miller invited him out to California the next year, where Roger recorded several of his songs, including “Me and Bobby McGee, which, of course became a hit for Janis Joplin as well. Kris signed with Monument records in 1969. Johnny Cash had a #1 hit in 1970 with Kris’ “Sunday Morning Coming Down”, Waylon Jennings covered “The Taker” and Ray Price recorded “For the Good Times”, which was #1 on the country chart and #15 on the pop chart. He won his first songwriting Grammy the following year for Sammi Smith’s “Help Me Make It through The Night”. He won two Grammys for Best Country Vocal Duet with his wife, Rita Coolidge, in the latter ‘70s. In the mid-1980s Kris recorded two “Highwayman” albums with friends, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings, and he has recorded seven studio albums since—the latest, “Feeling Mortal”, coming out in 2013. In 2017 Rhino Records reissued his album “The Austin Sessions”, originally recorded for Atlantic. Kris was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1977 and into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2004.
04:31PM-04:33PM (2:32) Kris Kristofferson “Jesus Was a Capricorn (Owed to John Prine)” from The Essential Kris Kristofferson (2004) on Sony — Originally released in 1972 on Monument Records, this is the title track of that album. It also included the first version of Kris' next song in this set.
04:33PM-04:36PM (3:01) Kris Kristofferson “Why Me” from The Austin Sessions (2017) on Atlantic New — "Johnny Cash said Jesus wrote a song called "Why Me, Kris."
04:36PM-04:40PM (3:41) Rosanne Cash “Lovin' Him Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)” from The Pilgrim: A Celebration of Kris Kristofferson (2006) on Emergent — A fine cover of one of Kris' finest.
04:40PM Set break — Closing out today's Back Country with a few songs about dads and grandpas.
04:42PM-04:46PM (3:39) Johnny Cash “A Boy Named Sue” from The Essential Johnny Cash, 1955-1983 (1998) on Sony — Originally recorded in 1969 for Columbia Records, written by Shel Silverstein and included on "At San Quentin." A possible inspiration for the song was Sue K. Hicks of Madisonville, TN, a friend of John Scopes of Monkey Trial fame.
04:46PM-04:48PM (2:11) Johnny Cash “Daddy Sang Bass” from At Madison Square Garden (2002) on Sony — Recorded in 1969 for Columbia Records, one written by Carl Perkins, who had by now replaced the late Luther Perkins as part of Johnny's shows. June was absent for this record, home pregnant with John Carter Cash..
04:48PM-04:50PM (2:55) John Prine “Grandpa was a Carpenter” from Souvenirs (2000) on Oh Boy (http://www.ohboy.com) — "And voted for Eisenhower 'cause Lincoln won the war."
04:51PM-04:55PM (4:04) Sturgill Simpson “Hero” from High Top Mountain (2013) on High Top Mountain — Sturgill wrote this for his late "Papaw", Lawrence "Dood" Fraley, whose voice is heard at the beginning of Sturgill's next album, "Metamodern Sounds in Country Music."
The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 06/10/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:03PM-03:04PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:05PM Set break — LESLEY RIDDLE was born on June 13, 1905 in Burnsville, NC. He lost part of a leg in an industrial accident and took up the guitar while recuperating, developing a unique picking and slide style. He was soon playing with others in the Kingsport, TN area, including Brownee McGhee. In 1928 he met A.P. Carter, who had formed The Carter Family the year before. He and A.P. traveled together in search of songs, with A.P. focusing on the lyrics and Lesley acting as a human tape recorder in learning the melodies. A number of songs in the Carter Family repertoire are thought to have been Riddle compositions or were transmitted by him, including “Cannonball Blues”, “Hello Stranger” and “Bear Creek Blues”, and he undoubtedly had an impact on the development of Maybelle’s “Carter Scratch” guitar style. He retired from music by 1945 but Mike Seeger recorded a number of songs with him twenty years later and he made some festival appearances. Lesley Riddle died on July 13, 1980 at the age of 75 and Rounder Records posthumously released some of the Seeger recordings in 1993, “Step by Step: Lesley Riddle Meets the Carter Family: Blues, Country and Sacred Songs”. Songwriter and multi-instrumentalist BLIND ALFRED REED was born in Floyd, VA on June 15, 1880. He was born without his sight into a conservative family and he learned to play the fiddle as a young boy, performing at county fairs, churches, political rallies and on the streets for tips. He was one of the many artists Ralph Peer recorded during the historic Bristol Sessions in 1927, recording four songs on July 28th. His lyrics were socially conservative and leavened with a sense of humor, but he gave up recording permanently two years later. He was by this time living in the Princeton, Mercer County, WV area and he continued to perform in the area until 1937, when a local ordinance was enacted prohibiting blind street musicians from entertaining. He died on January 17, 1956 at the age of 75, allegedly of starvation. He was inducted into the West Virginia Music Hall of Fame in 2007, the same year that saw a tribute album of his songs released, performed by fellow West Virginians like Little Jimmy Dickens and Tim and Mollie O’Brien.
03:06PM-03:08PM (2:54) Leslie Riddle “I'm Out On the Ocean A-Sailing” from Hills of Home: 25 Years of Folk Music on Rounder Records (1995) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — A.P. Carter's song-gathering buddy also influenced Maybelle's guitar style. Some of the Carter Family catalogue is thought to be songs written by Leslie Riddle.
03:09PM-03:12PM (3:31) Tim and Mollie O'Brien “You'll Miss Me” from Always Lift Him Up: A Tribute to Blind Alfred Reed (2007) on Proper — Lots of fine artists contribute to this album, including Little Jimmy Dickens, John Lilly, Ray Benson and Charlie McCoy.
03:13PM Set break
03:14PM-03:17PM (3:00) Sadie Hawkins Day String Band “Nail That Catfish to a Tree” from Oh Me, Oh My! It's Sadie Hawkins Day! (2015) on self — These folks are at the Shakespeare in Forest Park Green Show on Wednesday, the 14th at 6:30 and are at Laredo's on Lafayette on June 30th, a 7 o'clock start.
03:18PM-03:21PM (3:14) The Gibson Brothers “Homemade Wine” from In the Ground (2017) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — The Gibson Brothers return to St. Louis at the Old Rock House on Friday, June 30th for a 9PM show, part of the Listening Room Series.
03:20PM-03:23PM (3:01) Bobby Osborne “Eight More Miles” from Original (2017) on Compass Records New — Lots of folks helping Bobby on this Kieran Kane song, including Sam Bush, Jim Hurst and Michael Cleveland.
03:23PM Set break
03:25PM-03:28PM (3:55) Brandy Clark “You Can Come Over” from Big Day in a Small Town (2016) on Warner Brothers — Brandy Clark is at Delmar Hall next Thursday, June 15th, along with Charlie Worsham, 8PM start.
03:29PM-03:32PM (3:36) Leslie Tom “Leavin' on Your Mind” from Leslie Tom (2016) on Coastal Bend Music — A nice version of one made famous by Patsy Cline and co-written by Wayne Walker and Webb Pierce.
03:31PM Set break — EDWIN DUHON was born June 11, 1910 in Broussardville, LA. Along with Luderin Darbone he is the sometime-guitarist/accordionist and a founding member of the Hackberry Ramblers, one of the most important Cajun bands of the ‘30’s and ‘40s. Two innovations stand out for the Ramblers: their unique blending of traditional Cajun music with Western Swing and country songs and the introduction of electronic amplification at the dance halls in which they played. Edwin actually left the band a few years after its formation because he often worked the oil fields in other countries. He returned in the early ‘60s for good, however, and appears on all of the Hackberry Ramblers’ recordings thereafter. At the time of Edwin’s death on February 26, 2006 at the age of 95 the Hackberry Ramblers were the oldest continuously performing band in the United States.
03:33PM-03:35PM (2:29) The Hackberry Ramblers “Poor Hobo” from Deep Water (1997) on Hot Biscuits Recording Company — One credited to the Fiddle King of Cajun Swing, Harry Choates.
03:36PM Set break
03:37PM-04:00PM (23:00) Robbie Fulks “Alabama at Night, Aunt Peg's New Old Man and I'll Trade You Money for Wine” from none--live at KDHX 6.10.17 (2017) on KDHX — Thanks to Robbie Fulks for stopping by our KDHX studios last evening to record an instudio session before headlining Day 3 of Twangfest 21. He's a great talent and a nice guy.
04:00PM Set break
04:03PM-04:05PM (2:44) Faron Young “Goin' Steady” from The Complete Capitol Hits of Faron Young, Disc 1 (2000) on EMI Request — Sorry, I didn't have the one Bill and Annabelle requested. This is from early in his career, from the Capitol label in 1952.
04:05PM-04:08PM (2:21) Buck Owens “It Don't Show on Me” from Young Buck (1994) on Rhino — One of Buck's earliest recordings, from 1960 on the tiny LaBrea label. This one's going out to Matt.
04:08PM-04:11PM (3:05) Ed Burlison “All Bucked Up” from The Cold Hard Truth (2004) on Palo Duro Records — Sure would like to have some new music by this guy.
04:11PM Set break
04:12PM-04:15PM (2:38) Dennis Stroughmatt “Walking the Streets” from Wrong Side Of The World (2017) on MME Local, New — One written by Webb Pierce.
04:15PM-04:18PM (3:22) Diesel Island “Gonna be a Long Night” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid Records Local, New — The long-awaited debut album by local favorites, consisting of Brian Henneman, Kip Loui, Carl Pandolfi, Richard Tralles and Spencer Marquart. CD release show is going on at Off Broadway as we speak.
04:18PM-04:21PM (2:43) Ags Connolly “Haunts Like This” from Nothin' Unexpected (2017) on At the Helm Records — Ags is getting ready to play some shows in his native U.K. with Jim Lauderdale.
04:21PM Set break — Charles Arthur “CHARLIE FEATHERS was born on June 12, 1932 in Myrtle, near Holly Springs, MS. He was a rockabilly pioneer who never achieved the commercial success he thought should be his. He was at Sun studios in the mid-’50s and claimed to have arranged some of Elvis’ early material. What can be confirmed is that he co-wrote Elvis’ I Forgot To Remember To Forget”, which shot to #1 on country and western charts in 1955. His own debut on the Flip label, I’ve Been Deceived” was also released that year. He recorded as well for the Sun label and numerous small labels, including under the pseudonyms Charlie Morgan and Jess Hooper. Among his better-known recordings are “Get With It”, “Bottle To The Baby”, “You Talk Too Much”, and “Tongue Tied Jill”. Charlie Feathers is a Rockabilly Hall Of Fame inductee and he died on August 29, 1998 at the age of 66. Jamieson “JUNIOR” BROWN was born on June 12, 1952 in Kirksville, IN and will be 65 years old on Monday. He learned to play piano from his father and early in his career he honed his guitar and pedal steel skills in various groups, including Asleep at the Wheel. He was teaching guitar at the Hank Thompson School of Country Music at Rogers State University in Claremore, OK when he invented a double necked guitar that was a combination Telecaster and lap steel, calling it the “Guit-Steel. He later produced a second one and then a third that incorporated pedal steel action in the mix. His group was the house band at the Continental Club when they cut their first record in 1990 on a British label that was later reissued on Curb Records, for whom he recorded a total of half a dozen albums in the decade. He has also recorded for the Telarc label, and his latest release is a six-song EP called “Volume Ten”. While his stellar guitar work is most often found within Western swing and honky tonky styles, his albums almost always feature some extended blues jams as well as some surf guitar, and his dead-on Ernest Tubb baritone vocals (maybe not exactly dead-on, as Junior exhibits better pitch than E.T., bless his heart) will have you believing E.T. is still putting out records.
04:22PM-04:24PM (2:53) Charlie Feathers “So Ashamed” from Get With It: Essential Recordings (1954-1969) (1998) on Revenant — Probably a '60s recording date here.
04:25PM-04:27PM (2:28) Junior Brown “Broke Down South of Dallas” from 12 Shades Of Brown (1993) on Curb — From Junior's debut album.
04:28PM-04:32PM (4:36) Oak Steel & Lightning “Another Shot of Whiskey” from Chasin the Sunset (2017) on self Local — These guys are part of the bill next Saturday, June 17th, at Westport Saloon in Kansas City, billed as the Official Unofficial Willie Nelson Dwight Yoakum REK Afterparty.
04:32PM Set break
04:33PM-04:35PM (2:57) Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys “The Tear I Left Behind” from Empty House (2004) on Bloodshot (http://www.bloodshotrecords.com) — This KC-based outfit plays San Loo two weeks from tonight, June 24th, along with Cree Rider Family Band and Fred Friction. Show starts at 8PM.
04:36PM-04:39PM (3:09) Dale Watson and His Lone Stars “Don't Wanna Go Home Song” from Carryin' On (2010) on E1 Music — Two chances to see Dale and the Boys in our area: Tuesday, June 19th at the Rose Bowl Tavern in Urbana and Tuesday, June 20th at the American Legion Post No. 88 in Mattoon, IL.
04:39PM-04:42PM (3:16) Paul Nipper “Asphalt and Heartaches” from Kamikaze Heart (2017) on Paul Nipper Music New — Another artist new to my ears.
04:43PM Set break — Lincoln Wayne “CHIPS” MOMAN was born on June 12, 1937 in LaGrange, GA. He moved to Memphis as a teenager, working as part of Warren Smith’s road band before moving to L.A. and working with Johnny Burnette and Gene Vincent and doing guitar session work for Gold Star Records. He returned to Memphis and worked for Satellite Records—later Stax—leaving in 1964 to found his own American Sound Studio. During this time he also formed a songwriting partnership with Dan Penn, co-authoring such classics as “Do Right Woman” and “Dark End of the Street.” His studio’s productions were exemplary, and included arguably his best, 1969’s “From Elvis in Memphis.” He moved to Nashville in the early 1970s, co-writing the Waylon classic, “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)”, before finally relocating back to his hometown and opening a studio there. In 1985 he produced the first “Highwaymen” album from the supergroup consisting of Cash, Jennings, Nelson and Kristofferson. Chips Moman died on June 13, 2016 at the age of 79. WAYLON Arnold JENNINGS was born on June 15, 1937 in Littlefield, TX. His mother taught him some basic guitar chords and by the time he was 12 he was a disc jockey on the local radio station. He moved to Lubbock in 1954 and met Buddy Holly there the following year. He played bass with The Crickets in 1958 and early 1959 until that February 3rd day outside Mason City, IA when Buddy, Richie Valens and J.P. Richardson--instead of Waylon--were killed in a plane crash. Waylon moved to Phoenix and formed the first edition of The Waylors, playing at J.D.’s, a local club. A number of recordings on the Trend, Brunswick and Bat labels followed, as did country-folk releases on A & M. With Bobby Bare’s help, Chet Atkins signed Waylon to RCA in 1965 and he moved into a Nashville apartment with Johnny Cash. Music City has never quite been the same. Waylon continued pushing for artistic control in his music and finally realized it in time for the release of 1973’s “Honky Tonk Heroes”, which featured mostly the songs of Billy Joe Shaver. In 1976 Waylon teamed up with Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser and wife, Jessi Colter to record the first album in country music history to sell a million copies, “Wanted: The Outlaws. Waylon continued making records, including his work with Cash, Nelson and Kris Kristofferson on the “Highwaymen” albums, and touring until 1997. Years of fast living finally caught up with Waylon and he died on February 2, 2002 at age 64, but not before he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2001. True to his outlaw roots, Waylon refused to attend the inductees’ dinner. LEON Roger PAYNE, The Blind Balladeer, was born on June 15, 1917 in Alba, TX. He had sight in one eye at birth but lost that within a few years. He was a prolific songwriter who worked mainly in the 1940s and 1950s and penned a number of memorable songs, probably the best-known of which is “I Love You Because”, written for his wife, Myrtle. He played several instruments and appeared on KWET in Palestine, TX in the mid-30s, and had a brief time with Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys. In 1948 he teamed up with his stepbrother, famed songwriter Jack Rhodes (“Satisfied Mind”) in Jack Rhodes Rhythm Boys, before forming his own group, the Lone Star Buddies, appearing on the Louisiana Hayride, the Big D Jamboree and the Grand Ole Opry. Hank Williams recorded two of Payne’s compositions, “Lost Highway” and “They’ll Never Take Her Love from Me”. He continued recording until 1964, releasing two albums the prior year and even recording a rockabilly number under the name of Rock Rogers. 1965 was a year of highs and lows, as Leon suffered a heart attack as well as celebrating George Jones’ hit recording of his song, “Things Have Gone to Pieces”, the former of which severely curtailed his touring ability. Leon Payne suffered another heart attack a few years later and died on September 11, 1969 at the age of 52. Famed sound engineer Billy Rhodes “BILL” PORTER was born June 15, 1931 in St. Louis, MO. The family moved to Tennessee when he was ten and he grew up loving jazz and baseball, playing for a while in the minor leagues system. He repaired televisions and took an electronics extension course before accepting a job mixing sound for a Nashville television station and then applying for an opening as a sound engineer for RCA. He recorded Don Gibson’s “Lonesome Old House”, which became a country and pop hit, and artists began asking for him by name at their sessions. He recorded almost 600 songs at RCA (most in the legendary Studio B) that made the charts—49 in the Top Ten, 11 number ones and 37 certified gold --and recorded15 of Billboard’s “Top 100”, easily surpassing anyone else. When Chet Atkins was once asked how he got his sound he answered, “it was Bill Porter”. He was every bit as much responsible for the Nashville Sound in country music as were Chet and Owen Bradley. He recorded almost all of Elvis’ number one hits after he left the Army and finally left RCA over a disagreement about a small publishing company he and Anita Kerr had formed. He went briefly to Columbia Records before moving over to Fred Foster’s Monument label, creating a new studio on Seventh Street North and recording label artists like Roy Orbison and Jerry Byrd. He moved to Las Vegas in 1966 and opened a studio there, recording albums for some of the superstars who came to town. By this time Elvis had a residency at the International (now Las Vegas Hilton) Hotel and insisted that Bill mix his live shows (including touring even though his experience to that time had been solely with recordings) which Bill did until Presley’s death. He was the first president of record company Vegas Music International and is a past director of the Country Music Association. Later in life he taught audio engineering at the University of Miami School of Music, the University of Colorado at Denver and Webster University in St. Louis, and his curriculum is still in use today at many colleges. Bill Porter died on July 7, 2010 at the age of 79.
04:44PM-04:47PM (3:21) Waylon Jennings “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)” from The Essential Waylon Jennings (2007) on Sony BMG — Chips Moman co-wrote this one with Bobby Emmons.
04:47PM-04:50PM (3:08) Willie Nelson “It Gets Easier” from God's Problem Child (2017) on Sony Legacy New — Another Willie song. I can identify with this one.
04:50PM-04:52PM (2:44) Leon Payne “Teach Me to Forget” from I Love You Because (1999) on Bear Family — Several other artists have covered this Leon Payne song, including Merle Haggard.
04:53PM-04:55PM (2:10) Don Gibson “Lonesome Old House” from The Singer, The Songwriter, Disc 3 (1991) on Bear Family — One of Bill Porter's earliest engineering assignments, recorded for RCA in 1959.
The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 05/27/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:02PM-03:03PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddie's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa: The Instrumentals (2008) on Bear Family Records (http://www.bear-family.de)
03:05PM-03:07PM (2:46) Hank Williams and His Drifting Cowboys “Howlin' at the Moon” from The Original Singles Collection Plus (1991) on MERCURY NASHVILLE Request — From the MGM label in 1951, going out to Matt in Columbia, MO.
03:08PM-03:10PM (2:59) Sam Bush “Howlin' at the Moon” from Howlin' At the Moon (1998) on Sugar Hill Records — Same title, different song. I love the message in this one.
03:11PM Set break — HAZEL Jane DICKENS was born on June 1, 1935 near Montcalm, Mercer County, WV, the 8th of 11 children, and grew up dirt poor in a three-room shack, once telling a Washington Post writer that one whole winter she stayed in the house because she didn’t have a coat. Her father was a coal miner who preached on Sundays in the Primitive Baptist church, where the only instrument allowed was the human voice. She left home at age 16 and moved to Baltimore in part to care for a brother who had developed tuberculosis, and she worked as a waitress, retail clerk and factory worker. Her autobiographical song, “Mama’s Hand,” named Bluegrass Song of the Year by the IMBA in 1996, tells the story of her leaving. She made Washington, DC her permanent residence for the rest of her life, but her experiences as a child never left her. In DC she met Mike Seeger, Pete’s half-brother and husband of Alice Gerrard, and Hazel began playing bass in groups around the city. She and Alice released several albums of bluegrass and old time music, mostly in the first half of the 70s, thus establishing them as female pioneers in the genre. Hazel’s songwriting often focused on the hardscrabble existence of the working class and, especially working women, with songs like “Working Girl Blues” and “Mary Johnson”. She found wider acclaim after she sang four songs included in Barbara Kopple’s 1976 award-winning documentary about coal miners and their struggles, “Harlan County U.S.A.,” including a passionate version of “They’ll Never Keep Us Down” that closes the film. She performed for free for the film because she believed it needed to be seen by a wide audience. Hazel quit her day job in 1979 to concentrate on her music and she made several solo albums beginning with 1981’s “Hard Hitting Songs for Hard Hit People.” Her affinity for coal miners also extended to John Sayles’ film about union organizing efforts in the West Virginia coal fields in the 1920s, “Matewan,” where she appeared in a graveyard scene and sang “Beautiful Hills of Galilee.” Her singing style encompassed the “high lonesome sound” that bluegrass is noted for, coupled with the passion and pain of her subject matter, and she influenced numerous singers after her, including Emmylou Harris and Allison Krauss. As one of her compositions is titled, it’s hard to tell the singer from the song. Her last public appearance was at the SXSW festival in Austin in March 2011 and, as bluegrass veteran Dudley Connell, who accompanied her said, “…she had that Hazel swagger going…She pinned them to the wall, buddy, I’m not kidding you. My guess is their mouths are still open”. Hazel Dickens died on April 22, 2011 of complications from pneumonia at the age of 75. Thanks to the body of work she left, her voice will never be silenced.
03:12PM-03:15PM (3:39) Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard “West Virginia My Home” from Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard (1998) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — Originally recorded in 1980, one of Hazel's compositions, remembering her home she left at age 16 never to return.
03:16PM-03:19PM (3:25) Hazel Dickens & Alice Gerrard “Long Black Veil” from Pioneering Women of Bluegrass Music (1996) on Smithsonian Folkways (http://www.folkways.si.edu) — Hazel's vocal is right at home on this Danny Dill/Marijohn Wilkin classic, from the Folkways label in 1973.
03:19PM-03:22PM (3:43) Tim O'Brien “Few Old Memories” from Where The River Meets The Road (2017) on Howdy Skies New — Tim does a fine job on his fellow West Virginian's song here, and his new album is a good one.
03:23PM Set break — Gerald Calvin “JERRY” DOUGLAS was born on May 28, 1956 in Warren, OH and will be 61 years old tomorrow. His 1979 release “Fluxology” provided him with his nickname, Flux, and served notice that he intended to become the greatest living performer on the dobro, or resophonic guitar. After more than a dozen albums released under his own name, half a dozen with Alison Krauss & Union Station, and playing on more than 1600 albums, he is now widely considered just that. His latest project is recreating the great Flatt and Scruggs sound with The Earls of Leicester, whose latest album, “Rattle and Roar” came out in 2016. Jerry has won numerous awards, including thirteen Grammys, a National Heritage Fellowship from the NEA and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Americana Music Association.
03:25PM-03:28PM (3:08) Jerry Douglas “Things in Life” from Restless On the Farm (1998) on Sugar Hill Records — One written by Don Stover, with help here from Tim O'Brien on vocal, Russ Barenberg on guitar and Viktor Krauss on bass. Happy Birthday, Flux!
03:28PM-03:31PM (3:05) Robbie Fulks “Aunt Peg's New Old Man” from Upland Stories (2016) on Bloodshot (http://www.bloodshotrecords.com) — Robbie headlines Day 3 of Twangfest 21 at Off Broadway on Friday, June 9th. Parker Milsap and Cave States round out the bill that day.
03:31PM-03:34PM (3:02) The Lonesome Pine Fiddlers “Lonesome, Sad and Blue” from none--Jim Nelson's 78 collection (1951) on Coral — Thanks to old time music maven, Jim Nelson for making a digital version of some of his collection of hillbilly 78s.
03:34PM Set break — A set in honor of this weekend's celebration of Memorial Day. Henry Ellis “REDD” STEWART was born on May 27, 1921 in Ashland City, TN. He grew up in Louisville, KY and learned several instruments and rudimentary songwriting when he wrote a jingle for a local car dealership. He joined Pee Wee King’s Golden West Cowboys in 1937 and while serving in the South Pacific during World War II he wrote “Soldier’s Last Letter”, which Ernest Tubb recorded in 1944 (E.T. shared songwriting credit). He took over as lead singer in the Cowboys after Eddy Arnold left, and he wrote or co-wrote a number of the songs they recorded, including the all-time classic, “Tennessee Waltz”. He also wrote songs for other country stars and was a charter member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. He also appeared in a few Western films with Pee Wee King. Redd Stewart died on August 2, 2003 at the age of 80 and in 2005 a section of State Route 455 near his birthplace was renamed the Tennessee Waltz Parkway.
03:35PM-03:37PM (2:54) Charlie Louvin and Brennen Leigh “Robe of White” from Voices of a Grateful Nation, Vol. 2 (2008) on Welcome Home Project — Volume 2 features Texas and Americana artists.
03:37PM-03:40PM (3:41) Don Reno and Red Smiley with Bill Harrell & The Tennessee Cut-Ups “Soldier's Last Letter” from Together Again (2006) on Rebel Request — One written by birthday boy, Redd Stewart, from a 1971 reunion of the band. I didn't have the Reno & Smiley that Bill and Annabelle requested. E.T. recorded the song in 1944.
03:41PM-03:45PM (4:22) Jimmy LaFave “This Land” from Voices Of A Grateful Nation Vol. 1 (2008) on Welcome Home Project — So sad to hear of Jimmy LaFave's passing. He wrote this one and it appeared on his 2007 album, "Cimarron Manifesto."
03:45PM Set break — August “AUGIE” MEYERS, keyboard player with the Sir Douglas Quintet and the Texas Tornados, was born on May 31, 1940 in San Antonio, TX and will be 77 years old on Wednesday. He and Doug Sahm formed the SDQ in the early 1960s and his Vox organ became a signature sound of early hits like “She’s About a Mover” and “Mendicino”. In 1990 he and Doug joined Freddy Fender and Flaco Jiminez as Tex-Mex supergroup, the Texas Tornados, who made some great music for the rest of the decade until Sahm’s death. Augie has also released a dozen albums of his own, mainly on his own labels, and played on Dylan’s “Time Out of Mind” and John Hammond’s “Wicked Grin”. Augie is a few years down the road from undergoing a kidney transplant and his latest release is 2006’s “My Freeholies Ain’t Free Any More” on the El Sendero label. He appeared on the 2010 release, “Esta Bueno”, which he and surviving Texas Tornado, Flaco Jiminez recorded with Doug Sahm’s son, Sean.
03:47PM-03:51PM (4:44) Robert Earl Keen “Barbeque” from Gringo Honeymoon (1994) on Sugar Hill Records — You might also be cooking or eating some barbeque this weekend. Robert Earl Keen returns to St. Louis on Tuesday, June 6th, at Off Broadway, 8PM.
03:52PM-03:54PM (2:51) The Texas Tornados “Dinero” from Texas Tornados (1990) on Reprise (http://www.repriserecords.com) — Augie Meyers wrote this one and the TT included it on their first album. Whatever language you use, you've got to have the dinero.
03:55PM-03:57PM (2:16) The Cactus Blossoms “Stoplight Kisses” from none--live at KDHX 6.18.16 (2016) on KDHX — From a Back Country episode last year. The Cactus Blossoms are at the Stage at KDHX on Thursday, June 1st, 7:30PM. St. Louis' own Jenny Rocques opens.
03:57PM Set break
04:03PM-04:06PM (3:23) Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys “Let's Leave Me” from Empty House (2004) on Bloodshot (http://www.bloodshotrecords.com) — Looking forward to the return of Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys, along with Cree Rider Family Band and the beautiful and talented Fred Friction at San Loo on Saturday, June 24th, 8PM.
04:07PM-04:10PM (3:37) Cree Rider Family Band “It's 2AM (Do You Know Where Your Boots Are?)” from A Toast To Absent Friends (2016) on Cree Rider Family Band Local — It was a pleasure hosting these folks live from The Stage at KDHX on last week's Back Country.
04:10PM Set break — CYRUS WHITFIELD “JOHNNY” BOND was born on June 1, 1915 in Enville, OK. He was a member of Jimmy Wakeley’s trio, appearing in a number of Republic Pictures’ B Westerns as a supporting musician. He was also part of Tex Ritter’s studio band, the Red River Valley Boys. He had a number of hits in the late 1940s including “The Daughter of Jole Blon”. His best-known composition is probably “I Wonder Where You Are Tonight”, which is at least as prominent in the bluegrass catalog as it is in country, and its dozens of version by various artists provided a steady income for Johnny. Johnny Bond died on June 12, 1978 at the age of 63 and he was posthumously inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1999. Texas fiddle virtuoso John Paul “JOHNNY” GIMBLE was born on May 30, 1926 in Bascom, just east of Tyler, TX. As a teenager he played with two of his brothers as the Rose City Swingsters until Johnny moved to Louisiana and began playing with Jimmie Davis. He joined Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys when Bob signed with MGM in the late ‘40s, playing 5-string fiddle and electric mandolin. He stayed with Wills until the 1960s and then became an in-demand session player, appearing on Haggard’s Bob Wills tribute album and Chet Atkins’ “Superpickers” release, as well as releasing ten albums of his own. In his later years Johnny was a frequent guest on Garrison Keillor’s “Prairie Home Companion” and in 2010 he released “Celebrating with Friends on the CMH label. His son, Dick and granddaughter, Emily have continued the musical tradition in the Gimble family. Johnny won multiple Grammys and was the recipient of a National Heritage Fellowship as Master Folk Artist by the National Endowment for the Arts. Johnny Gimble died on May 5, 2015 at the age of 88. Steel guitarist PAUL V. FRANKLIN was born on May 31, 1953 in Detroit, MI and will be 64 years old on Wednesday. He began his career playing for Barbara Mandrell and you can hear Paul on almost any George Strait recording but he has also worked with artists of other genres, including Dire Straits and Megadeath. Paul is an innovator, having created the Pedabro, which looks and plays like a pedal steel guitar but sounds like a hybrid resophonic guitar. He also invented The Box, a long narrow box of ten strings that, according to Paul, sounds somewhat like a swampy acoustic guitar played with a bottleneck. Paul continues to record and perform as a member of The Time Jumpers and in 2013 he and Vince Gill recorded “Bakersfield”, paying homage to the songs of Buck Owens and Merle Haggard. Paul was inducted into the International Steel Guitar Hall of Fame in 2000.
04:12PM-04:14PM (2:58) Johnny Bond & His Red River Valley Boys “So Round, So Firm, So Fully Packed” from Swinging Hollywood Hillbilly Cowboys (2004) on Proper — From the Capitol label 70 years ago in 1947. Johnny's version of the Travis-Stone classic rose to #3 on the charts.
04:14PM-04:17PM (3:10) Johnny Gimble and Dale Watson “I Needed You” from Celebrating with Friends (2010) on CMH (http://www.cmhrecords.com) — Johnny co-wrote this one with Bob Wills. Dale is across the state at the Westport Roots Festival this weekend in Kansas City. Several St. Louis-area bands are also on the schedule.
04:17PM-04:21PM (3:34) The Time Jumpers “All Aboard” from Kid Sister (2016) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — A Paul Franklin composition.
04:21PM Set break — GARY STEWART was born on May 28, 1944 in Jenkins, KY. He recorded for the Cory and Kapp labels without notice, but after moving to Nashville some of his songs did well for other artists, including Billy Walker and Cal Smith. He signed with RCA and 1974’s “Drinkin’ Thing” from his critically acclaimed album, “Out of Hand”, became a Top Ten hit and he followed that up with a #1 single, “She’s Acting Single (I’m Drinkin’ Doubles”). He sang in a vibrato voice and was thought too country for rock and too rock for country, and he returned to Florida in the 1980s, where drug and alcohol abuse and the suicide of his son all but assured no recordings. He recorded three albums at the end of the decade for the Hightone label and continued to tour and perform throughout the next decade and released “Live at Billy Bob’s Texas” in 2003. However, the day before Thanksgiving that year his wife of 43 years, Mary Lou, died of pneumonia and his depression mushroomed until he died less than a month later of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on December 16, 2003 at the age of 59. DON WILLIAMS was born on May 27, 1939 in Floydada, TX and is 78 years old today. He was a singer-songwriter for the JMI label when one of his recordings reached #5 on the country chart and he signed with ABC/Dot. His first single, “I Wouldn’t Want to Live if You Didn’t Love Me” went to #1 and from 1974 through 1991 he produced a string of Top Ten hits—in fact, only four singles out of 46 released during this time failed to make the Top Ten. He ostensibly retired in 2006 but, perhaps motivated by his 2010 election to the Country Music Hall of Fame, Don recorded two fine albums for Sugar Hill in the last five years but has finally hung up his guitar, this time for good, according to Don.
04:23PM-04:25PM (2:18) Jim Ed Brown “Pop a Top” from Heroes of Country Music, Vol. Two: Legends of Honky Tonk (1996) on Rhino Request — From the RCA label in 1966, this one couldn't have been written a whole lot sooner. The "pop top" or pull ring version for beer cans wasn't manufactured until 1963, when Pittsburgh's flagship Iron City beer brand began selling the cans.
04:25PM-04:28PM (3:08) Gary Stewart “Make It a Double” from Best of the Hightone Years (2002) on Hightone — Another one gone too soon. Suicide is a major problem in this country and we do a poor job of addressing it.
04:29PM-04:32PM (3:46) Don Williams “I'll Be Here in the Morning” from Reflections (2014) on SUGAR HILL (http://ww.sugarhillrecords.com) — Don put out a couple of fine albums for Sugar Hill late in his career, here with a fine cover of a Townes Van Zandt tune.
04:33PM Set break — Donald Eugene Lytle, also known as Donny Young and best known as JOHNNY PAYCHECK was born on May 31, 1938 in Greenfield, OH. One of his earliest gigs was playing bass and steel guitar for George Jones, as well as singing the tenor vocal role with The Possum. He was one of Ray Price’s Cherokee Cowboys in the early ‘60s as well as recording with Faron Young and Roger Miller. He recorded under the name of Donny Young and had a hit in 1960 with “Miracle of Love” and also wrote songs, notably “Apartment #9”, which was a big hit for Tammy Wynette. In 1964 he changed his last name to Paycheck and the next year had his first #1 recording, “A-11”. Johnny’s work on the Hilltop and Little Darlin’ labels in the latter ‘60s is some of the best, straight-ahead honky tonk you will ever hear, punctuated by the pedal steel work of Lloyd Green. Billy Sherrill became his producer in the 1970s, which saw his megahit, 1977’s “Take This Job and Shove It”. He became identified with the “Outlaw Movement” in country music but he carried it a little too far when he shot a man in a Hillsboro, OH bar in 1985 and was sentenced to 7 years in prison, later pardoned by Governor Richard Celeste. He wrestled with drug and alcohol addiction and in the end was suffering from asthma and emphysema when he died on February 19, 2003 at the age of 64, with George Jones paying for his Nashville funeral. JOHN Cameron FOGERTY was born on May 28, 1945 in Berkeley, CA and will be 72 years old tomorrow. He first appeared in a band with older brother, Tommy and after they signed with the Fantasy label in 1965 they recorded as The Golliwegs. John avoided the draft the next year by joining the Army Reserves, from which he was discharged in 1967, by which time the band had been renamed Credence Clearwater Revival. Their first hit was a remake of the Dale Hawkins’ (and, uncredited, James Burton) classic, “Suzie-Q”, and they followed that with a string of hits, mostly from their first three albums. After CCR broke up, John began a solo career using the name Blue Ridge Runners and playing all instruments on an album of country music covers. He has maintained a solo career to this day with a 2007 comeback album, “Revival” and in 2009 he went back to his solo debut with “The Blue Ridge Runners Ride Again”. His latest release, “Wrote a Song for Everyone” came out in 2013 on the Vanguard label.
04:34PM-04:36PM (2:48) Johnny Paycheck “Touch My Heart” from The Real Mr. Heartache The Little Darlin' Years (1996) on Country Music Foundation — From the Little Darlin' label 50 years ago in 1967, one of Johnny's compositions. Mavis Staples does a stunning version of it on the tribute album that I played next.
04:37PM-04:41PM (4:42) Hank Williams III “I'm the Only Hell My Mama Ever Raised” from Touch My Heart: A Tribute to Johnny Paycheck (2004) on SUGAR HILL (http://ww.sugarhillrecords.com) — Tricephus does a good job on this minor key classic.
04:42PM-04:44PM (2:35) John Fogerty “Heaven's Just a Sin Away” from Blue Ridge Rangers Rides Again (2009) on Verve (http://www.vervemusicgroup.com) — John's first post-Credence Blue Ridge Runners album came out in 1974. This song was a hit for St. Louis artists, The Kendalls, back in 1977.
04:44PM Set break
04:46PM-04:48PM (2:33) Willie Nelson “Still Not Dead” from God's Problem Child (2017) on Sony Legacy New — Willie's still not dead. His video for this song is pretty funny.
04:48PM-04:50PM (2:46) Alison Krauss “I Never Cared for You” from Windy City (2017) on Capitol Records New — This is just a top-notch album from start to finish. Here Alison covers Willie.
04:51PM-04:55PM (4:12) Jeremy Steding and The Rebellion “Get Me the Hell Off this Rig” from Odessa (2017) on self New — Odessa has been a boom-and-bust oil town for the better part of a century now. I can sure imagine a worker singing these words.
The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 05/20/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:02PM-03:03PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddy's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa (2008) on Bear Family
03:03PM Set break
03:06PM-03:09PM (3:23) Leslie Tom “Hank You Very Much” from Leslie Tom (2016) on Coastal Bend Music — Hank You Very Much to everyone who donated to KDHX during our spring drive and to those members who provide ongoing support.
03:09PM-03:12PM (3:18) Willie Nelson “He Won't Ever Be Gone” from God's Problem Child (2017) on Sony Legacy New — Texas songwriter Gary Nicholson's tribute to Merle.
03:12PM Set break
03:13PM-03:17PM (4:37) Kathy Mattea “Dark as a Dungeon” from Coal (2008) on R.E.D. Request — This one's going out to Jim in Glendale.
03:18PM-03:23PM (5:03) Gram Parsons “$1000 Wedding” from The Gram Parsons Anthology (2001) on Rhino Request — And I'm sending this one out to Russ. From Gram's final album in 1974 on Reprise.
03:23PM Set break — Malcolm B. “MAC” WISEMAN was born May 23, 1925 in Crimora, VA and will be 92 years old on Tuesday. Mac joined Molly O’Day’s Cumberland Mountain Folks in 1946, playing bass on her first Columbia session. He briefly worked as a sideman at WCYB in Bristol and became a guitarist with Flatt & Scruggs, cutting a Mercury session with them. He worked on Bill Monroe’s October 1949 session for Columbia, even taking a solo lead on “Travelin’ down This Lonesome Road”. After he moved to Richmond, VA he formed and maintained the Country Boys, which at times included Eddie Adcock, Scotty Stoneman and Buck Graves. He is possessed of a clear tenor voice and he differed from other bluegrass acts in that he rarely sang with harmony vocal accompaniment. His first Top 10 hit?--1955’s “Ballad of Davy Crockett”. Mac’s material went back and forth between country and bluegrass for the next thirty years on labels such as Rural Rhythm, Dot and CMH. He was a founding board member of the Country Music Association in 1958 and is one of the very few artists who have been inducted into both the IBMA Hall of Honor (1993) and the Country Music Hall of Fame in (2014).
03:25PM-03:27PM (2:54) Mac Wiseman “Shackles and Chains” from Most Requested (2001) on CMH (http://www.cmhrecords.com) — Written by Jimmie Davis, here performed with the Osborne Brothers.
03:28PM-03:31PM (3:23) Bobby Osborne “Pathway of Teardrops” from Original (2017) on Compass Records (http://www.compassrecords.com) New — One written by Webb Pierce, June Hazelwood and Wayne Walker. Bobby Jr., Wynn and Robby Osborne also play on this one.
03:31PM-03:35PM (4:01) Front Country “Millionaire” from Other Love Songs (2017) on Organic Records New — From their latest album.
03:35PM Set break
03:36PM-03:38PM (2:57) Dennis Stroughmatt “Faded Love” from Wrong Side Of The World on Music Mill Entertainment — Dennis Stroughmatt's tribute to Ray Price, "Talk to My Heart", takes place tonight at The Focal Point in Maplewood, 8PM start time.
03:40PM-03:43PM (2:37) Willie Nelson “Don't You Ever Get Tired (of Hurting Me)” from For the Good Times: A Tribute to Ray Price (2016) on Legacy — Sometimes it's hard to keep up with prolific recording artists. Willie's tribute to his pal, Ray Price, was somewhat overlooked when it came out last year.
03:41PM-03:43PM (2:47) Ray Price “Take Back Your Old Love Letters” from Time (2002) on Audium — A classic Ray Price shuffle, written by the man himself.
03:43PM Set break — Robert Allen Zimmerman, better known as BOB DYLAN, was born on May 24, 1941 in Duluth, MN and will be 76 years old on Wednesday. He is one of the premier songwriters of my generation or any generation. He inhabited Greenwich Village in the heady ‘60s and legendary A & R man and producer John Hammond signed him to Columbia. He legally changed his name in 1962 to Bob Dylan, but has been known to record under pseudonyms, including Blind Boy Grunt, Bob Landry and, on Ramblin’Jack Elliott’s 1964 album he was Tedham Porterhouse. He abandoned folk and topical music in favor of plugging in with 1965’s “Bringing It All Back Home” and following up that with “Highway 61 Revisited”. He enlisted former members of Ronnie Hawkins’ Hawks, for his band (they were shortly to rename themselves The Band). As the decade was turning over he again confounded his fans by recording “Nashville Skyline” in Music City. Did you know that “Lay, Lady, Lay” was submitted—alas too late—for inclusion in the 1969 hit film, “Midnight Cowboy”? Since then he has released 27 more albums not counting a bizarre Christmas release. He has won 11 Grammy awards, is a member of the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame, and in 2012 he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Oh, and he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016. ROSANNE CASH was born on May 24, 1955 in Memphis, TN and will be 62 years old on Wednesday. She is the oldest daughter of Johnny Cash and Johnny’s first wife, Vivian Liberto. She was born less than a month before Johnny’s first recording session for Sun Studios which produced “Cry, Cry, Cry”. She studied English literature and drama at Vanderbilt University before relocating to L.A. She cut an album for a German label that was never released, before joining future husband, Rodney Crowell’s band, the Cherry Bombs, marrying him in 1979. Her second album, “Seven Year Ache”, was a critical and commercial success but she spent much of the 1980s raising her three children with Crowell. Her 1988 duet with Rodney, “It’s Such a Small World”, became a number one hit. After her marriage ended she moved to New York City and married John Leventhal in 1995, with whom she continues to record and perform. She has had her share of medical problems, unable to sing for 2 ½ years due to polyps on her vocal chords and she underwent brain surgery in 2007 from which she has fully recovered. She has authored several books and supports several charities, including PAX, dedicated to preventing gun violence among children. She has been nominated for ten Grammys (one winner) and although her material goes beyond just country music, she has had eleven number one songs on the country charts and 21 in the Top 40. In 2009 she released “The List”, recordings based on a list of 100 songs Johnny wrote out and told 18 year-old Rosanne she needed to learn. Early in 2014 she released her Grammy-winning “The River & the Thread”, perhaps her finest work. Mark Lavon “LEVON” HELM was born on May 26, 1940 in Elaine, AR. He and his sister, Linda, formed “Lavon and Linda”, she on a homemade string bass and he on guitar and harmonica, and they played to modest local success, opening for Conway Twitty among others when he was still playing rock ‘n’ roll and calling himself Harold Jenkins. He made good on his promise to his parents to finish high school but soon after joined Ronnie Hawkins as a drums-playing Hawk, soon joined by Canadians Rick Danko, Richard Manual, Garth Hudson and Robbie Robertson. They finally tired of Hawkins’ relentless driving of the group and formed Levon and the Hawks. By 1965 Bob Dylan wanted an electric sound to his music and he enlisted the group, now living in a big pink house in Woodstock and calling themselves The Band, but Dylan’s legions of folkies weren’t yet ready for the change. The Band released their debut album, “Music from Big Pink” in 1968 and became one of the biggest rock acts of the time, finally calling it quits at their historic concert in 1976 at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, chronicled in Martin Scorsese’s “The Last Waltz”. Levon built his home and studio, “The Barn” in Woodstock and one of his first productions, “Muddy Waters in Woodstock” won a Grammy. Levon produced some solo albums following the breakup and began acting in films, playing Loretta Lynn’s daddy in “Coal Miner’s Daughter” and later in “The Right Stuff” and a number of other projects. He and Rick Danko reunited for an acoustic tour (Levon was also a fine mandolin player) and were later joined by Manual and Hudson until the former’s tragic death. The Band recorded three albums in the 1990s before Levon was diagnosed in 1998 with throat cancer. As he recovered and slowly regained his vocal prowess, he began hosting his legendary “Midnight Ramble” sessions at The Barn, live performances featuring the very best musical artists around. Levon went back into the studio in 2007 to release his first solo album in 25 years, “Dirt Farmer”, which won a Grammy and put Levon’s name in the Rolling Stone mix of Top 100 Singers of All Time. He followed that up two years later with a second Grammy winner, “Electric Dirt”, and then took the Midnight Ramble to the Ryman Auditorium for 2010’s “Ramble at the Ryman”, which won him his third straight Grammy award. Unfortunately, Levon’s cancer returned shortly after this endeavor and he died on April 19, 2012 at the age of 71. Perhaps a quote from a 1983 interview in the Mandolin World News best sums up Levon’s down-to-earth musical vision: “And you know, playing-wise, music don’t owe anybody a living. Just because you play music, it ain’t supposed to make you rich or famous. It’s supposed to be your life, and it’s supposed to help you, and help those you love, and you’re supposed to play it, really try. And if you get a shot, if you get on national television, or if you get a record out that somebody can remember, great. That ought to encourage you not to quit, but it don’t mean a whole lot. You know, that was day before yesterday, and if that’s the best that any of us can do, it ain’t going to count for long. So, in case we can’t do any better, at least we can show up and have a good time”. TOM T. HALL was born on May 25, 1936 in a log cabin in Olive Hill, KY and will be 81 years old on Thursday. Nicknamed “The Storyteller”, he headed to Nashville in 1964 after Jimmy C. Newman recorded his song “DJ for a Day”. Within months he had other songs on the charts and he married Dixie Dean, English émigré and editor of “Music City News”, and they were inseparable until her death in 2015. His financial future was secured when Jeannie C. Riley’s version of Tom’s “Harper Valley PTA” sold six million copies in 1968. Other memorable songs include “The Year Clayton Delaney Died” (a real-life figure who taught Tom T. about music), “(Old Dogs, Children and) Watermelon Wine”, and “Faster Horses”. He has recorded for Mercury and RCA and lately, on his own Blue Circle label. More recently, Tom T. has written songs for children and for his 75th birthday Eric Brace and Peter Cooper released a tribute album, “Songs of Fox Hollow”. Tom was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1978 and 30 years later in 2008 was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Tom has retired from performing and public appearances since Dixie’s passing.
03:46PM-03:49PM (3:35) Rosanne Cash “Girl from the North Country” from The List (2009) on Manhattan — The first of two songs written by Nobel Prize for Literature winner, Mr. Zimmerman.
03:50PM-03:54PM (4:17) Levon Helm Band “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” from Live at Merlefest 04/26/2008 (2008) on festivalink.net — Levon is one of my musical inspirations.
03:54PM-03:57PM (3:07) Tom T. Hall “One of Those Days (When I Miss Lester Flatt)” from Sings Miss Dixie and Tom T. Hall (2005) on Blue Circle — And I miss seeing Tom T. playing his music.
03:57PM Set break
04:01PM-04:19PM (18:00) Cree Rider Family Band “Callin' the Shots, Whiskey Warm and Mellow and I'll Be Back” from Live at The Stage at KDHX (2017) on KDHX Local — Thanks to Cree Rider Family Band for playing live at The Stage at KDHX on today's Back Country. Their new album is "A Toast to Absent Friends."
04:17PM Set break — Mirriam Johnson, aka JESSI COLTER, was born on May 25, 1943 in Phoenix, AZ and will be 74 years old on Thursday. It must have been an interesting childhood growing up in a family whose mother was a Pentecostal preacher and whose father was a racecar driver. After high school she sang in clubs around Phoenix and caught the attention of Duane Eddy, whom she eventually married in 1963. In 1969 she married Waylon Jennings, who helped her get a contract with RCA but her only album with them went nowhere despite Chet Atkins’ producer credit. She signed with Capitol in 1975 and her debut single, “I’m Not Lisa” went to #1. She got greater exposure the next year when she was part of the first million-selling album Nashville ever saw, “Wanted: The Outlaws”. She largely put aside her career to attend to Waylon’s drug and medical issues and after his death she released “Out of the Ashes” in 2006. Her latest album came out in March 2017, “The Psalms”, biblical lyrics set to music.
04:18PM-04:21PM (3:04) Waylon Jennings and the Waylors “Amanda” from RCA Country Legends (2001) on Buddha Request — Sending this one out to Mike Stuart in Columbia, IL. Also to Darrell and Norma Veile, old friends from college days who are visiting. Darrell liked Don Williams' version so much he named their daughter Amanda. She's now a professor at Purdue University.
04:21PM-04:24PM (3:11) Jessi Colter “Why You been Gone So Long?” from Wanted! The Outlaws (20th Anniversary Edition) (1996) on RCA — Happy Birthday to Jessi Colter.
04:24PM-04:28PM (4:02) Willie Nelson “Yesterday's Wine” from Wanted: The Outlaws, 20th Anniversary Edition (1996) on RCA — From the first million-selling album in country music history.
04:27PM Set break
04:29PM-04:31PM (2:30) Diesel Island “When I Write My Number One” from Diesel Island (2017) on Euclid New — Diesel Island is at the Iron Barley's Anniversary event tomorrow afternoon, schedule to play at 3:30PM. Their CD release show takes place on June 10th with a matinee show at Off Broadway starting at 2:30PM.
04:32PM-04:34PM (2:15) Jesse Dayton “I'm at Home Gettin' Hammered (While She's out Gettin' Nailed)” from The Revealer (2016) on Blue Élan Records LLC — Jesse is on the bill at the Old Rock House next Friday, May 26th, along with The Legendary ShackShakers, getting underway around 8 o'clock.
04:34PM-04:36PM (2:44) Jesse Dayton and Brennan Leigh “Long Legged Guitar Pickin Man” from Holding Our Own and other Country Gold Duets (2007) on Stag — A fine album of duets by this Texas duo, here covering Johnny and June.
04:37PM-04:39PM (2:32) Jerry Reed “Guitar Man” from RCA Country Legends (2001) on Buddha — 60 years ago today in 1957 this song first charted, peaking at #53. Elvis recorded it shortly thereafter with Jerry playing guitar and it appeared in the movie, "Clambake."
04:39PM Set break
04:43PM-04:45PM (2:57) Cropduster 4 “Bottom of the Barrel” from Three Chords and the Truth EP (2016) on self — A group out of Chicago new to my ears.
04:46PM-04:49PM (3:40) Bobby Bare “The Trouble with Angels” from Things Change (2017) on BFD New — It's kind of amazing to see so many great stars releasing new material into their 80s.
04:49PM-04:52PM (3:07) Ags Connolly “I Suppose” from Nothin' Unexpected (2017) on At the Helm Records New — New music from British country artist, Ags Connolly. His sophomore release is a good one.
04:52PM-04:55PM (3:22) Sunny Sweeney “Nothing Wrong with Texas” from Trophy (2017) on Aunt Daddy Records New — One she co-wrote with Lori McKenna, Tommy Detamore on the pedal steel. I hear a lot of Nanci Griffith from Sunny on this one.
The Back Country (Music) with Jeff Corbin 04/22/2017 03:00PM to 05:00PM
03:02PM-03:03PM (1:52) The Texas Troubadours “Buddie's Boogie (intro)” from Almost To Tulsa: The Instrumentals (2008) on Bear Family Records (http://www.bear-family.de)
03:04PM Set break — GLEN Travis CAMPBELL was born on April 22, 1936 in Billstown, a tiny town near Delight, AR and is 81 years old today. After high school he spent several years in New Mexico playing in his uncle’s band, Dick Bills and the Sandia Mountain Boys, also appearing on local radio and television shows. He moved to LA in 1960 and became one of the legendary session players known as “The Wrecking Crew”, playing on recordings by Sinatra, Haggard and Nat Cole among many. In 1965 he toured briefly with the Beach Boys in place of Brian Wilson, and he played guitar on their classic “Pet Sounds” album. His biggest hit to date was Buffy Sainte-Marie’s “Universal Soldier”, wherein the pacifist nature of the song was mitigated by his observation that “people who are advocating burning draft cards should be hung”. He became an overnight success with John Hartford’s “Gentle on My Mind”, leading to a replacement show when The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour was canceled by CBS, and eventually starring in his own “Goodtime Hour”. He continued in TV and film in the 1970s, and he scored major hits with Allen Toussaint’s “Southern Nights” and his biggest hit, “Rhinestone Cowboy”, which sold more than two million copies. In 2011 he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and the next year he undertook a Goodbye Tour, capping it with a rendition of “Rhinestone Cowboy” at the 2012 Grammy awards. Glen re-recorded some of his previous work in 2013, releasing, “See You There.” He now resides in a long-term care treatment facility for the disease.
03:05PM-03:08PM (3:09) Glen Campbell “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” from See You There (2013) on Surfdog Records — Upon learning of his Alzheimer's diagnosis Glen went into the studio and re-recorded some of his best-known works, including this Jimmy Webb classic.
03:08PM-03:11PM (3:34) Alison Krauss “Gentle on My Mind” from Windy City (2017) on Capitol Records — Glen's recording of this John Hartford tune really set his solo career in motion.
03:12PM Set break — The “Caruso of Country Music”, ROY Kelton ORBISON was born April 23, 1936 in Vernon, TX. His earliest hit was “Ooby Dooby” for the Sun label. He later joined fellow Texan Joe Melson to pen some classics for the Monument label, including “Only the Lonely”, which hit #1 in Britain and #2 in the U.S. Eight Top Ten hits between 1960 and 1964—produced by Fred Foster--secured his reputation. A series of personal tragedies in the late 60s slowed his career considerably, including the death of his first wife, Claudette, and two children who perished in a fire that destroyed their home in Henderson, TN. In 1987 he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in less than a year was a member of the Traveling Wilburys, along with Bob Dylan, George Harrison and Tom Petty. Roy had a heart attack within a few months and died on December 6, 1988 at the age of 52. DUANE EDDY was born on April 26, 1938 in Corning, NY and will be 79 years old on Wednesday. He met Lee Hazelwood, then a disc jockey, and Hazelwood recorded his first singles in the mid ‘50s. Duane devised a technique of playing melody on the bass strings of his Gretsch guitar that produced a twangy reverb-like big guitar sound and his second hit, “Rebel Rouser” was a million seller (later featured in the films “Forrest Gump). His group, The Rebels, featured members who would later be part of the famous Wrecking Crew studio musicians in Los Angeles. His 1959 debut album, “Have Twangy Guitar Will Travel” (he appeared in two episodes of the classic TV Western “Have Gun, Will Travel”) went to number five on the charts and his second album helped Duane bump Elvis from the number one spot on at least one publication’s survey as World’s Number One Music Personality. He married Jessie Colter in 1962, the same year his third million selling single, “(Dance With) The Guitar Man” was released. He produced albums in the 1970s for Phil Everly and Waylon Jennings, who by now was married to Colter. His 1986 remake of his recording of Henry Mancini’s “Peter Gunn” was a Grammy winner and gave Eddy his fourth Top Ten instrumental hit in four different decades. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 and Chet Atkins presented him with a Chetty award in 2000. He contributed two recordings with steel guitarist Dan Dugmore to the 2013 tribute album to steel guitar genius Buddy Emmons.
03:13PM-03:15PM (2:59) Roy Orbison “Pretty Woman” from Live at the BBC (1998) on Mastertone — From a 1968 appearance on "The Beeb".
03:16PM-03:18PM (2:23) Duane Eddy “Sweet Cindy” from Girls! Girls! Girls! (1961) on Jamie — The album cover includes photos with Brenda Lee, Annette Funicello and others. Playing some vinyl on Record Store Day.
03:19PM-03:22PM (2:44) Special Consensus “Slow Train Through Georgia” from Our Little Town (1998) on Pinecastle — From the Norman Blake catalog. Special Consensus is at Oak Tree Concerts on Sunday, April 30th, 3PM.
03:22PM Set break — Western swing bandleader and fiddler CLIFF BRUNER was born April 25, 1915, in Texas City, TX. He grew up in nearby Houston and his first musical experiences were as a teenager with traveling medicine shows. He joined Milton Brown’s Musical Brownies in 1935, playing twin fiddles with the classically-trained Cecil Brower, to record nearly 50 songs before Brown’s death in 1936. He formed the Texas Wanderers (sometimes called Cliff Bruner and His Boys) in 1937, among whose members were Bob Dunn and Moon Mullican. His 1938 recording of Floyd Tillman’s “It Makes No Difference Now” rode the top of the charts for 20 twenty weeks and he made the first recording of Ted Daffan’s “Truck Driver’s Blues” in 1939. He recorded on both Decca and Mercury before Cliff disbanded the group in the early ‘50s, but continued to make music and his trio appears in the 1984 Sally Field movie, “Places in the Heart”. Cliff Bruner died on August 25, 2000 at the age of 85. Fiddler Allen DALE POTTER was born on April 28, 1929 in Puxico, MO. His father taught him fiddle and guitar and he became a country music believer after listening to broadcasts of Bob Wills on KVOO in Tulsa. Since there was no television or mass media he was unaware that Wills featured multiple fiddle players in the Texas Playboys, so Dale developed a fiddle technique that allowed him to play the melody and harmony parts, reflective of his later nickname, Mr. Double Stop. He moved to Nashville and made his Grand Ole Opry debut at age 18. Zeb Turner used him on recording sessions and his first studio session with Hank Williams resulted in “Wedding Bells” and “Lost Highway”. He subsequently recorded with many Nashville stars, including Webb Pierce, Cowboy Copas, Ray Price and Bill Monroe, and appeared on the Everly Brothers first recording session in 1955. He was married for a time to Anita Carter of the Carter Sisters and he was one of RCA’s Country All Stars, one of whose members, Chet Atkins, called him “the best all-around fiddler in the business”. He passed along his fiddle prowess to the great Buddy Spicher as well as many others. He recorded in the 1960s with Judy Lynn and the Sons of the West, but poor health eventually curtailed his musical career. Dale Potter died on March 13, 1996 at the age of 66.
03:24PM-03:27PM (3:03) Cliff Bruner's Texas Wanderers “I'll Keep on Loving You” from Bob Dunn: Master of the Electric Steel Guitar 1935-1950 (2010) on Origin Jazz Library — From the Decca label in 1938, Floyd Tillman wrote it and provides the vocal.
03:27PM-03:29PM (2:22) The Country All Stars “Fiddle Patch” from Jazz from the Hills (1994) on Bear Family — From the RCA label in 1952. Chet, Homer and Jethro and Charles Grean round out the players on this one.
03:29PM-03:32PM (2:49) Richard Smith and Aaron Till “My Window Faces the South” from Out of Nowhere (2004) on self — Guitar virtuoso Richard Smith returns to St. Louis on Friday, May 5th for a show at The Focal Point and he's at Log House Concerts Sunday, May 7th at 7PM.
03:32PM Set break — Talented multi-instrumentalist HERB PEDERSEN was born on April 27, 1944 in Berkeley, CA and will be 73 years old on Thursday. He formed The Pine Valley Boys in the latter ‘60s, which included Butch Waller and David Nelson, and he was a later member of The Dillards. He became an in-demand session player for numerous artists, including Jackson Browne, John Denver and Linda Ronstadt. He was part of Emmylou Harris’ Hot Band for a time and even though he had met Chris Hillman in 1963 it wasn’t until 1986 that they joined forces in the Desert Rose Band. He and Hillman also recorded two acclaimed albums in the 1990s with Larry and Tony Rice and, more recently, returned to his bluegrass roots by forming the Laurel Canyon Ramblers. He and Hillman continue to perform occasionally today.
03:34PM-03:36PM (2:59) Chris Hillman and Herb Pedersen “Together Again” from At Edwards Barn (2010) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — These Desert Rose Band alums put out an acoustic album a few years back, here covering Buck. A strong statement at the beginning from Chris Hillman, who says without Buck there wouldn't have been The Byrds or the Flying Burrito Brothers.
03:36PM-03:39PM (3:23) Ags Connolly “When the Loner Gets Lonely” from Nothin' Unexpected (2017) on At the Helm Records New — Ags has a fine new album out. Ameripolitan outlaw artists Mike Maddux and the Ponderosa Aces are currently touring the UK with Ags.
03:40PM-03:42PM (2:45) Marcia Ball “Daddy Said” from Gatorhythms (1989) on Rounder (http://www.rounderrecords.com) — The wisdom of the paterfamilias is sublime. Marcia headlines the Crawfish Festival and Boil at the Broadway Oyster Bar today.
03:42PM Set break
03:45PM-03:48PM (3:50) Cree Rider Family Band “The Voice of Johnny Cash” from A Toast To Absent Friends (2016) on Cree Rider Family Band Local — Cree Rider Family Band's 5th anniversary show is next Saturday, April 29th, at the Milque Toast Bar, along with many special guests. Things get underway around 4 o'clock.
03:48PM-03:51PM (3:05) Jonathan Edwards “Honky Tonk Stardust Cowboy” from Rollin' Along: Live in Holland (2008) on Strictly Country Records — Jonathan Edwards is at the Wildey Theatre in Edwardsville for a show on Friday, May 5th, 8PM.
03:51PM-03:54PM (3:51) The Mavericks “For the Ages” from Brand New Day (2017) on Mono Mundo/Thirty Tigers (http://www.themavericksband.com) — The Mavericks play The Pageant two weeks from tonight on May 6th.
03:55PM-03:58PM (3:38) Joe Ely “She Finally Spoke Spanish to Me” from Letter to Laredo (1995) on MCA — One written by fellow Flatlanders member, Butch Hancock. Joe is at Blueberry Hill's Duck Room on Saturday, May 6th.
03:59PM Set break — Front Country performed three songs from their new album, "Other Love Songs": 1) If Something Breaks; 2) T.H.A.T.S. (The Humpback and the Sloth); 3) I Don't Wanna Die Angry.
04:02PM-04:20PM (18:00) Front Country “various” from none-live at kdhx (2017) on KDHX — Thanks to Front Country for stopping by our KDHX performance studio on today's Back Country. They're playing tonight at the Stage @KDHX, 8PM.
04:22PM Set break — VASSAR Carlton CLEMENTS was born on April 25, 1928 in Kinard, SC. and by his 21st birthday he had appeared with Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys on the Grand Ole Opry. He was a member of Jim & Jesse’s Virginians from 1957-61. In 1969 he followed a gig with Faron Young’s Country Deputies with a stint in John Hartford’s classic Aereo Plain band, followed by a stay with the Earl Scruggs Review. During this time he was in demand as a studio musician as well, appearing on early albums by Steve Goodman, David Bromberg and Mike Auldridge among others. In 1972 he appeared on “Will the Circle Be Unbroken”, which largely secured his career. In the mid-70s he helped launch the Flying Fish label with a double LP release, Hillbilly Jazz, featuring Bromberg, D.J. Fontana and Doug Jernigan. Vassar also helped create a new generation of bluegrass fans with his work with Old and In the Way. Vassar was a master of many musical styles on the fiddle and was perhaps the “bluesiest” of the bluegrass fiddlers. Vassar died on August 16, 2005 at the age of 77.
04:25PM-04:34PM (9:39) Vassar Clements et. al. “Orange Blossom Special” from MerleFest Live!: The Best of 2003 (2004) on MerleFest — The all star lineup is introduced at the end. Performed on the occasion of Vassar's 75th birthday and I'm proud to say I was there to see it.
04:34PM Set break — Mandolin great ROLAND WHITE was born on April 23, 1938 in Madawaska, Maine and will be 79 years old tomorrow. The Canadian-American family name was LeBlanc, changed by the time the family moved out to California. The family played early gigs at the local Grange Hall and on radio and television as “The Country Boys”. When he got out of the army the name of the group changed to the Kentucky Colonels and 1964 marked a watershed year for the group with an acclaimed appearance at the Newport Folk Festival—and flatpickin’ brother, Clarence doing a guitar workshop with Doc Watson—followed by the release of “Appalachian Swing”. Roland joined Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys in the late ‘60s for a short spell and then recorded several albums with Lester Flatt as part of the Nashville Grass. After Clarence’s untimely death, he joined fellow Colonels bass player Roger Bush and Alan Munde in Country Gazette, playing with them for 13 years. He followed that with a stint in the Nashville Bluegrass Band from 1989 to 2000. He currently heads the Roland White Band and is in demand as a mandolin and guitar teacher. PAT ENRIGHT was born on April 22, 1945 in Huntington, IN and is 72 years old today. He toured with 18-year old Bela Fleck in the late ‘70s from his Nashville base before joining the Nashville Bluegrass Band in the mid ‘80s, and he has remained a member since. His favorite singer is Jimmie Rodgers so it wasn’t surprising to find him yodeling and singing as John Turturro’s character, Pete in the blockbuster film, “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Pat and the Nashville Bluegrass Band have released ten albums over the last 30 years, plus two compilations of their work. ELDON SHAMBLIN was born April 24, 1916 in Clinton, OK. As a young man he was influenced by the recordings of Eddie Lang and Joe Venuti, and he took an interest in music arrangement, a skill he put to good use when he joined Bob Wills. He had worked in dance halls and radio in Oklahoma in the mid-‘30s and was known as the other great guitarist in Oklahoma—Charlie Christian being the other—when he joined the Texas Playboys for ten years beginning in 1937, with an interruption for World War II. During this time he developed a two-beat rhythm arrangement which would come to influence many others, among them Chuck Berry, who reworked “Ida Red” into “Maybelline” and his twin guitar work with steel man Leon McAuliffe was a major influence on Duane Allman and Dickie Betts. He stayed with the band until 1954 and then left the music business for 15 years. He joined Merle Haggard on his Bob Wills salute, “A Tribute To The World’s Greatest Fiddle Player” in 1970, and Rolling Stone magazine named him the greatest rhythm guitarist in the world. Eldon stayed with the Strangers for a few years and he eventually returned to the reincarnated Texas Playboys in the 1980s as well as guest appearances with Asleep at the Wheel, Johnny Gimble, Tiny Moore and many others. Eldon Shamblin died on August 5 1998 at the age of 82.
04:35PM-04:38PM (3:15) The Kentucky Colonels “Brakeman's Blues” from Long Journey Home, 1964 (2006) on Vanguard Records — Roland has the lead vocal on this Jimmie Rodgers song.
04:38PM-04:41PM (3:15) The Nashville Bluegrass Band “Gambling Barroom Blues” from Twenty Year Blues (2004) on Sugar Hill Records — Birthday boy Pat Enright on the vocal for another Jimmie Rodgers tune.
04:41PM-04:43PM (2:58) Merle Haggard “Brain Cloudy Blues” from A Tribute To The Best Damn Fiddler In The World or My Salute To Bob Wills (1970) on CAPITOL — The great Eldon Shamblin joined Hag as one of the former Texas Playboys who played on this tribute album.
04:43PM Set break
04:46PM-04:48PM (2:46) The Louvin Brothers “The Great Atomic Power” from When I Stop Dreaming: The Best Of The Louvin Brothers (1995) on Razor & Tie (http://www.razorandtie.com) Request — Going out to Bill and Annabelle in Farmington. Recorded for Capitol Records in 1961, the year before the Cuban missile crisis.
04:48PM-04:51PM (3:02) The Gordons “I Woke Up With Tears In My Eyes” from End of a Long Hard Day (1997) on Reception Records Local, Request — I hope this is the song the listener requested. I only had what I think was a partial title.
04:51PM-04:54PM (3:29) Bobby Osborne “Leaving Wheeling” from Original (2017) on Compass Records (http://www.compassrecords.com) New — New music from 85-year old Bobby Osborne, here covering a Mel Tillis song. Bobby still sounds great!

Inga kommentarer:

Skicka en kommentar